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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Jefferson City, MO
    Posts
    3

    Post

    I have a two part question for everyone. First of all, I will be leaving for one year to go to Michigan while my wife tends to my bees. Would it be recommended to just leave the honey supers on all hives so that I can be assurred that they will winter with enough food (as compared to extracting). Secondly, I have my hives located on my one acre lot in a subdivision. I originally only had two hives, but one hive swarmed to a cedar tree about 15 yards from the original. I would like to get all my hives in ONE natural area. I was pleased to read the entries about moving the hive at night and then placing branches in front of the hive...so I did it (i.e. moved the hive 15 yards). My concern is that there are about 100+ bees returning to the original site. Any thoughts on what to do? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Twig, Minnesota USA
    Posts
    66

    Big Grin

    JerBee... I initially had lost bees returning to the old site, but by the end of the day, I didn't see any. The next day there were a few lost bee, but they didn't stay long. I hope that helps..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    if you have an extra empty hive you can place it in the old spot and shake the lost bees into the new location in the evening.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,299

    Post

    I put an extra empty box there, at the old location (no drawn combs or anything to attract them, with top and bottom) and, after dark, close it up, take it to the new location and just set it beside the hive, open it up with a branch in front of it. They fly out in the morning and reorient again, and by the second day there are none at the old location.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,299

    Post

    Assuming you are running deep boxes for brood and shallow or mediums for supers and a queen excluder. I would not leave supers on for the winter. If you leave the queen excluder on they cluster could move up and leave the queen behind. If you don't leave it on you could find the queen laying in the supers. If you have two deeps mostly full they should winter fine. Three deeps would be more insurance, but I haven't found it necessary.

    How much work does you wife want to do with the bees? If you leave them alone and the mites don't kill them, they should do ok on their own, although they will probably swarm. I think I'd try to get them established in three deeps if I was just going to leave them alone for a year.

    I assume that's why you are asking because you want to have minimal effort for her but still have a hive when you get back?

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