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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Castle, VA USA
    Posts
    90

    Question

    It's rainy here too. Missed the locust bloom and most of the poplar bloom. I was wondering if bees can get anything from multiflora roses or daisies, as they are both plentiful here.

    This is a great forum, I've been lurking for a while, this is my first post. I've learned alot.

    ------------------
    Andy
    New Castle, VA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,298

    Post

    I occasionally see a bee on a wild rose,never on a garden rose.We have acres of wild Shasta daisies here.Never saw a bee on one.
    ---Mike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I agree with Mike on the roses. I often see bees in the early morning on my rose bushes, but they are gathering dew from the leaves rather than foraging in the flowers. I have yet to see one in the flowers.

    No info on daisies.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,802

    Post

    Another thing to keep in mind about bees is that they often CAN get something from a plant, but choose not too because there is a more appealing or abundant nectar source somewhere else. In other words, they might work in under the right circumstances, just like you might eat something you really don't care for much if you are hungry enough.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I have about 10 million daisies right now and have not seen one honey bee on one. Should be easy to spot to.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    We have many multiflora rose bushes on our property. One that is only about fifty foot in front of my apiary is about ten foot high and fifteen foot across, good size.

    I see the bees working it while in full bloom, what they are collecting I don't know, but they are all over it.

    Bill

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Castle, VA USA
    Posts
    90

    Post

    I guess I'll have to rely on white clover and smartweed until the thistles bloom. My wife keeps telling me "They're bees,they will figure it out" but still I worry. It has been unusually wet this year, and I just got two package hives this march.
    Here,(mountains of SW VA) there is a plant called a box stickweed that blooms in late Aug. / Sep. with yellow blooms, somewhat goldenrod like. A beekeeping mentor of mine says he has to freeze the honey to kill the taste. Anyone know about this?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Marietta, GA USA
    Posts
    26

    Post

    If you are in the mtns of Va, perhaps you will get some sourwood (blooms in July). It in my opinion is the primo of primo honeys.

    In July, you will see trees with clusters of small tinker bell shaped flowers. The flow is kinda funky and crops are either very good or average. I got 300 lbs off 4 hives in three weeks in Western NC last year.

    Good luck

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    Andy- the only yellow flower that blooms here in Aug and Sept that makes a bitter honey is what we call bitterweed (and it does make bitter honey- I've tasted it). It may be the flower you are referring to. No good for the beekeeper, but supposedly a good source for winter stores in the hive. That's probably one of the reason that lots of beekeepers in this area harvest prior to the bitterweed bloom.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Ridgeway, VA , USA
    Posts
    72

    Post

    Andy,

    Hi, Duane. I live just south of you in ridgeway, VA. South central Va. The weather
    here has bee very rainy this spring. I think it has rained about 42 out of 50 days since the first of May. Aweful spring honey year. The bees are doing some real unpredicable things this year due to soooooo much rain. Personally, I am looking forward to the sourwood, which will start blooming around middle of July. You may be fortunate enough
    to get a crop off of this if you have any
    sourwood in your area.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Castle, VA USA
    Posts
    90

    Post

    Guess what everybody? I went walking in the woods yesterday and found five sourwood trees within 300 yds. of my bees. You would think living here all my life(not yet) as an avid outdoorsman and farm boy I would know whether or not there were sourwood trees here.I guess they didn't look good for fenceposts or firewood and I've never found squirrels in one so I didn't pay much attention. Amazing how bees will open your eyes.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    yesterday morning early i saw bees on the petals of petunias,drinking the dew.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Thumbs down

    I'm not expecting much of a harvest it has been to rainy here as well. 8-(

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rapidan, VA. U.S.A
    Posts
    62

    Post

    Here in Rapidan the paridise trees (Ailathus) are in blum I have a bunch of those around. I also have a butterfly bush by the house, and saw some bees on that the other day.

    I wish I knew what a sourwood tree looked like. I'd like to know if there are any in this area (central VA).

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    indiana dnr has a state nursery that sells bundles of trees by the hundred for about $20 each spring.check it out,maybe your state does the same.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Charliebuck: found some pictures that my help,http://www.plantbuzz.com/trees/small/oxydendrum.htm

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Castle, VA USA
    Posts
    90

    Post

    Basswood trees are starting to bloom here.I think bees can use them because i've seen Basswood honey for sale. I don't know if the bees will stay out of the white clover and thistles long enough to find them though.

  18. #18
    mmundy Guest

    Angry

    Been awful rainy here too, which was great for my lawn. Lots of cool nights... we hardly need the A/C on and I don't ever recall waiting so long in Missouri for that. For the first time in my life I'm starting to see that what feels good to me isn't good for my honey bee! (That rhymes) So with all the great weather, I still can't enjoy it because of my dog-gone hobby!

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