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Thread: moths in hive

  1. #1
    1richie Guest

    Question

    I have found moths in my hive and identified them by pictures found on these forms. My queston is now that I know what is in my hive and destroying it, what can I do to save the rest of the hive? I also have another hive 8 feet from this hive, will the moths spred to it?

    Thanks for any help

    ------------------
    Richie

  2. #2

    Arrow

    Richie,
    Traditionally taught beekeeping says that if you have wax moths in your hive, then some other problem(s) exist. That is another way of saying that a strong, healthy hive will fight (successfully) to keep wax moths out of the hive. Wax moths are a SYMPTOM of a greater problem within the hive and are not "the problem", themselves.
    Wax moths will quickly cause a weak hive to collapse and create a really nasty mess to clean up.
    You need to find out what's going on in your hive. Is it queenless? Does it have a Varroa problem? Is it starving? Something is causing a greater problem that allows the wax moths to get a "foothold" in the colony.
    Determining what is the problem is the first step in saving this colony's life. If you don't see a problem, have another experienced beekeeper take a look at it.
    It may be too late to save this colony; if you make that determination, then combine it with a strong colony; they will expell (kill) the wax moths. Mainly, don't let the situation get out of hand.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    Is this a hive with bees in it? or vacant colony? Moths usually cannot take the comb if you have a strong healthy colony. If it is small or weak for some reason, then the moths could take it over and destroy.

    I would:

    1. If this is a vacant beehive, place all wax/wood into a large garbage bag or two, and add para-moth crystals, then seal.

    2. If it is a STRONG hive, the bees probably can handle the moths.

    3. If it is a weak hive----
    a. Remove all frames and/or supers that the bees don't cover. If these are empty, place them in plastic bags with para-moth crystals and seal. If they have honey extract first, then bag.
    b. Try to give the hive some strength by stealing brood/bees from another hive.


    Para-diclorobenzene = Para moth. Buy from any bee supply.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Post

    I agree the first step is figuring out what else is wrong.

    In the meantime you can use Certan to kill the moths that are there. Certan is certified as safe for people and bees and is a bacteria that kills the moth larvae. It's available from www.beeworks.com and is listed as simply "wax moth control". http://www.beeworks.com/uspage5.asp see the bottom of the page.

    You mix it up and spray it on the combs that have the wax moths (or all the combs if you like). It is Bacillus thuringiensis which is also the stuff that people put in their bird baths to kill the mosquito larvae.

    You can use it in the hive with the bees.



    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited September 11, 2003).]

  5. #5
    1richie Guest

    Sad

    I think my hive is queenless but I did see some hard larva (dead) and small amounts of what could be worker laid cells. Could not find queen.

    ------------------
    Richie

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Post

    That is the primary problem then. Do you have a hive you can shake these out in front of? I think I'd shake them in front of another hive and scrap the wax and harvest the honey and feed it back.

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