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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Cardington, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    65

    Post

    Hello all! I have another question. We had a really awful mosquito problem last year...in an effort to take care of that this year I asked my husband to build us some bathouses. If I encourage bats to live here will they eat my bees? Thanks in advance for all input! Cheryl

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC, USA
    Posts
    71

    Post

    Not a problem. The bats are nocturnal and are out feeding while the bees are snug in the hive. You are going to bee a great beekeeper! Love, Dad

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

    Post

    I've had bats everywhere I've lived and never had a problem. The bees aren't out at night and the bats aren't out in the day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    Cheryl,
    I won't repeat what everyone has told you, which is true here in the USA. There are some diurnal (daytime active) fruit-eatting bats, but they won't bother your bees unless your bees are dressed like kiwi fruit and smelling of strawberries.
    I just wanted to complement you on your bat houses. I finally moved to where I can have my own bat houses and everyone asks me, "why do you want to make a house for them?" This gives me the oportunity to educate people on a few issues. 1)Bats are supposed to be here just as daisies and butterflies are, 2) bats are highly beneficial (if their lives need to be justified) by, as you know, eatting mosquitos and other "pest" insects, and 3) with man's behavior of altering the environment, we have a tendancy to reduce the natural living quarters of bats.

    If more habitat were provided for bats and other insect predators, less agricultural chemicals would need to be used >>>> less chance of our bees being poisoned. Hmmm, bats are good for Beekeepers!!!!

    I encourage you to look at the Bat Conservation International website. I hope you and your family will be interested in helping out in the "bat house research project". Koodo's to you.
    Coyote

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Post

    Every summer I will end up with a bat inside my house at least once. Maybe it is because of the bats that I am able to leave the doors wide open and not be eaten alive by bugs. I would like to encourage bats to occupy my neighborhood but I find them to be a little too creepy to actually want them in the house! I have not heard of any problems with bats here in Oregon, however, in Washington some have been found with rabies. Now, that's really creepy.
    George

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    George,
    True, as most people enjoy to point out, bats do carry rabies. However, so do many other mammals. Where I live in AL, rabies is a problem with everything from racoons to dogs and cats, however, even here, it has been determined that less than 1/100 of a percent of bats carry rabies. It appears that the bats that are often "found" have died from rabies and that is the reason that they were "found" as they were. And of course, "Healthy bat with No Illnesses Whatsoever Found in the Middle of the Forest" doesn't really make the news.

    Of course, I would encourage anyone to leave the job of removing a bat from the house to a professional. I find that a good-sized fish net is convient for capturing those. I am also vaccinated for rabies so that I can work with wild mammals.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

    Post

    >And of course, "Healthy bat with No Illnesses Whatsoever Found in the Middle of the Forest" doesn't really make the news.

    And of course a healthy bet with no illnesses whatsoever is usually not even noticed let alone found. They are only flying at night and hiding in the day.

    If you see a bat out in the daytime crawling around on the ground there is a good chance it IS diseased. If you find it in an attic or a hollow tree or a cave, it's probably trying to sleep.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85

    Post

    As a biologist, I feel compelled to tell everyone that yes, most bats in the US carry rabbies. The good news is that unless your flying over a stream or pond at night and you are exceptionaly small you are not going to get bit by one.

    If you find a bat in the house, take a deep breath, put some some heavy gloves on and grab him gently yet firmly and put him outside. If you want to make a bat house to keep your mosquito counts down you can find plans at http://www.bats.org.uk/batinfo/batbox.htm

    I was a beekeeper in the philippines and we had tons of bats but the real problem was the swifts (a small bird species). They would swarm to the apiary during the day and actually cause quite a bit of damage.

    So in short, bats have rabies but they are our friends. They make look scary but all they really are is mice with specialized front legs that act like wings. If you can get your hands on one without soiling yourself you will be quite fascinated by them.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    My neighbor made me a bat box for my birthday a couple of years ago which I have not hung up yet. He painted the inside of it black--I've heard the inside should not be painted--and he painted the outside a light blue--some left over paint he had. Do I need to repaint it or since bats are "blind" will it really matter?
    After reading this thread I'm encouraged to get the box hung up somewhere this spring.
    Denise

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    after you catch the blam thing's then what do you do with them? I have afew hundred that takes up at my house ever year,have tried everthing to get rid of them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

    Post

    >after you catch the blam thing's then what do you do with them? I have afew hundred that takes up at my house ever year,have tried everthing to get rid of them.

    I haven't tried it, but I would buy one of those ultra sonic mice repellents. The ones at the farm stores are the best and most expensive, but I bet a bat would find it just as irritating, if not more, than a mouse.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Cardington, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    65

    Post

    Denise, you should check out the bat conservation website previously mentioned. I'm not sure about the inside but the outside color depends on where you live. The color is a climate control factor for the bats, absorbing heat and such.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    As I biologist, I feel compelled to inform everyone that bats are not like mice with wings. They are, in fact, very different from mice. They may be more closely similar to humans in their body structure.

    Bat Conservation International Website http://www.batcon.org/

    Painting of bat houses: (just made two this week for myself). As CherGarr mentioned, the color of the outside is very important. It effects the temperatures inside the house, and for the most part, warmer is better. So much so, that black is the prefered color of bat houses in most places of the US. Also, location is important. As as you follow ChergGarr's advice, you will find placement recommendations on the BCI website.

    And, NO, bats are not blind. They see as well as us in similar conditions.

    Painting the inside: I spray a bit of black paint up into the entrances of each chamber to reduce the glare. It is better that the inside is DARK.

    Have Bats in the Belfrey? As with all of your household pests, the first order of business should include finding out where they come in and closing that. If they can't get in, they won't. Do this before they return this spring!! Simple as that. If they are already in your house, seal all entrances, and cover one with a large strip of mesh. Attach it to the house on all of its edges except the bottom. The bats should be able to climb down the mesh to get out, but not back up to get back in.

    Wayacoyote@hotmail.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Thanks for the info--I'll check out the site and guess I have a bit of painting to do.
    Denise
    PS:Personally, I think bats are cute and fascinating. But so are mice...well, mice aren't fascinating--they're a nuisance.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    At the Fish and Wildlife Refuge, I work with, we have "bat watches" during the summer where we take visitors out to watch the bats fly. They may have something like that in your area. You may contact Rick Huffines at the Clarks River Wildlife Refuge (270) 527-5770 and see if there are any programs there to let you experience that.
    WayaCoyote

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Bring them to my house,They can watch all they want.HEHE

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85

    Post

    > As I biologist, I feel compelled to inform everyone that bats are not like mice with wings. They are, in fact, very different from mice. They may be more closely similar to humans in their body structure.


    OK, perhaps I shouldn't have confused the non biologists out there with my mice reference. Yes, there body structure is closer to humans (at least our arms), and they have the amazing ability to slow down their metabolic rates to incredibly low rates (big reason they live so long) but when it comes down to it, unless you have a flying fox in your hand (which I have--both hands actually) the closest things the resemble is a mouse. Or perhaps a scarry hamster.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85

    Post

    ooops, one last thing. If you put a bat box up it can take a LONG time for bats to inhabit it.

    Of course it depends on where you put it and what the population of local bats is.. but don't expect to install it on friday and have bats hanging in it by sunday. (several of mine have taken up to 3 years). I would say about 10 out of about the 75 that I have installed.

    When there full though they are pretty cool!!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    >OK, perhaps I shouldn't have confused the non biologists out there with my mice reference. Yes, there body structure is closer to humans (at least our arms), and they have the amazing ability to slow down their metabolic rates to incredibly low rates (big reason they live so long) but when it comes down to it, unless you have a flying fox in your hand (which I have--both hands actually) the closest things the resemble is a mouse. Or perhaps a scarry hamster.

    Oregon... I am sorry but the "scarry hamster" made me laugh. I guess I am thinking of the Rabbit in Monty Python's Search for the Holy Grail. I hope you have plenty of Holy Handgrenades.

    Wayacoyote

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Cardington, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    65

    Post

    That's hysterical! Do the bats have "great big fangs"?

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