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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
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    769

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    How are some of you measuring the cell size. is there some kind of tool to use.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,782

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    A ruler. Measure across ten cells with a ruler marked in Cm and Mm. Start on the inside of one wall and measure to the outside of the last cell. Write this down. Do this three times, once horizontal, once at an angle going down to the right, and once at a angle going up to the right. Add the three numbers together and divide by 30 to average the size of the three measurements and get the size of only one cell.
    http://www.beesource.com/pov/osterlund/abjaug2001.htm

    See Photo 3.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

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    Thanks Michael now why did i not think of the averageng.In the tool and die trade we call it a scale.Since getting on this site i notice alot more things. some of me bees are just slightly smaller.it i decide to go with the small cells i will try some of the smaller bees on it in the spring.Another thing i was thinkin.If i was to have the bees make a natural queenand use the brood from the smaller bees, would this make a smaller queen willing to lay in the small cells.Or if i do splits use the small bees.I just may have the ticket to regress and dont know it.
    I work in inches not metric but i read one of your posts.You were talkin about 4.95 mm and wanted 4.9. now i can see where .5mm or .020 inch makes a big differance..05mm i dont think will hurt much.just for perspective .05 mm would be a very fine blond hair.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,782

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    >If i was to have the bees make a natural queenand use the brood from the smaller bees, would this make a smaller queen willing to lay in the small cells.

    I have put wax coated PermaComb with the equvilant cell size to 4.95mm in about fifty hives. Of these I have had two "regular" oversized queens that could not or would not lay in the small cell. One I killed and requeened and the other absconded. But yse, they will raise smaller queens and they will also happily lay in the small cells. From my experience even the "regular" commercial queens I have bought see to prefer to lay in the small cell over the large cell when both are available.

    >Or if i do splits use the small bees.I just may have the ticket to regress and dont know it.

    If you just keep using small cell foundation (or no foundation) and keep measuring and putting the smaller stuff in the middle of the brood nest you'll get regressed eventually. Otherwise, you can do shakedowns where you take all their comb and force them to make new comb (in the spring of course, not this late)

    >I work in inches not metric but i read one of your posts.You were talkin about 4.95 mm and wanted 4.9. now i can see where .5mm or .020 inch makes a big differance..05mm i dont think will hurt much.just for perspective .05 mm would be a very fine blond hair.

    My goal, based on Dee Lusby's work, was 4.9mm. I was happy to get to 4.95mm and I figure three generations or so of cocoons will probably fill out the .05mm. The bees from this comb seem to happily build 4.8mm to 5.0mm for worker brood on blank starters strips with 4.85mm about the norm.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Micheal, how many generations are raised in a year in the brood comb?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Daisy,

    Depends! How long is ones brooding season, where one lives, and a whole host of other factors such as how prolific the queen is, ect.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,782

    Post

    Like he said, it depends. I'd figure around 10 "generations" around here in an average year. More the further south you go, less the further north you go.

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