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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    Hi all,
    I driving out to get my 2 bee families late this afternoon.

    I am nervous because it is supposed to rain all day and maybe some thunder boomers this afternoon.

    They will be in my hives with frames of brood, pollen and honey. I'm putting them in the middle seat of my mini-van and driving - oh about an hour or so.

    When I get these home. I bet it will be dark. I am planning on using my two wheeler to cart them from the van to their spots.

    I was going to cook up some syrup today, but...with the rain ...should I just wait until the storms pass (ya never know in the midwest whether it will rain for days or just the afternoon) then give them a bit of syrup? I'm gonna plop in some small cell around the frames I am receiving (she uses the regular size). Again wait - how long?

    I guess I know how my husband felt while I was in labor!!!

    Thanks,
    Martha

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I would put the feed in first. And hive the bees as soon as you get them home. The rain will only help reinforce their need to stay put.

    If you mean because you feed outside your hive, you can get arround this by using ziplock bags. Make your syrup and pour into ziplock bags until they are about 3/4 full. When you lay the bags in the hive, use a sharp razor blade to cut 3 slits into the center of each bag you use. I use sandwich size ziplock bags. Two at a time has lasted me 5 days.

    The priority is to get the bees in the hive immediately, so they can get to work. They don't need to get out right away, but they need to start building comb as soon as possible.

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    "Linux is a Journey, not a Guided Tour" ~ Me
    "Do or not do, there is no try" ~ Master Yoda
    BeeSourceFAQ: http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Leonardtown, Md, USA
    Posts
    235

    Post

    Good luck Martha,

    Remeber when you are transporting the bees in the car, make sure the frames run parallel to the front and back of your car.
    This way, the frames wont jostle around as much when you stop and go.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    Are then in a hive? If so, make sure everything is connected REALLY well. I would nail it all together AND strap it, myself and then strap it so it can't tip over. And you might wear a veil anyway. An angry bee can be very distracting. If a hive tips over, ten thousand angry bees can be VERY VERY distracting.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Remeber when you are transporting the bees in the car, make sure the frames run parallel to the front and back of your car.
    This way, the frames wont jostle around as much when you stop and go.

    This is exactly opposite as what I do. The shorter wheel base of a vehicle's width makes the vehicle jostle from side to side more than front to back, especially on rough terraine, fields, and farm roads. I am soft on the gas and brake so I don't get much swaying fro and aft.

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