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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Belding, MI
    Posts
    67

    Post

    Hello yet again,

    Ok, this is just a thought, but, whats the viability of using aromatic ceder to keep moths out of the comb thats being stored? We make little packets of ceder to stick in every box of clothing that we store away, it keeps the moths out of the stuff. Will it work with the wax moths, and, will it afect the wax, or the honey? I do want to save the comb where posable, as its not been treated with apistan or any other drugs that I know of. When the mites hit them, thay just said, screw it, and let the bees die out. Just buying a package if thay wanted to refill a hive. Was cheeper than the aspitan at the time. So the wax I have is pretty contaminate free. I am just looking for alternatives to wax moth control.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,424

    Post

    Certan or freezing the combs are what I use. I hate the smell of Paramoth.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I think that cedar chips are a workable idea. It works for moths that get in clothing so it follows that it would work for supers. I chopped up pieces of cedar and put them in supers last year, and didn't have any wax moth problems- but I probably wouldn't have had problems anyway. My supers had brand new wax, and wax moths aren't interested in new wax (ironically enough)- they only like brood cocoons. I put cedar chips thoughout the stacked supers, and of course put a lid on top. I'll be trying it again this year... we'll see.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Cedar is most often used as a buildign material to prevent wood born pests. This often can include wax moth since the larvar partially bore into wooden cracks to pupate, but I am not sure how it would deter a wax moth from entering the hive and laying eggs. The larvae don't have to pupate inside the hive, they can leave and pupate on a tree in the bark.

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    Foundationless Small Cell Top Bar Hives
    BeeWiki: http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/

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