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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    baltimore, md, usa
    Posts
    37

    Post

    I'm talking with a local farmer about placing some hives near his crops this spring. We're discussing which crops to plant to reduce the likelihood of needing to spray. He's willing to plant soybeans instead of greenbeans ("snapbeans" he calls them) since the greenbeans will definitely need lots of insecticide spraying and the soybeans might not need any. He said that usually the soybeans, at most, might need a fungicidal spray with "Ronilan" or "Thompson M." for the possibility of Asian soybean rust.

    Question: any recommendations for references/advice on the safe deployment of honey bees in this kind of situation?

    Many thanks,

    David in Baltimore

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,199

    Post

    Your doing the right thing. Talking to the land owner/crop grower is the best insurance from an insecticide kill off.
    Just work with him, and accomidate his needs. It is his crop the bees are on
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    When you get notice of an inpending perticide spraying what are you supposed to do?? Do you close down the entrance? If so for how long?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    A booming hive is difficult to shut down. But if you have a SBB and if you have a screened door (like Brushy Mt makes) it can help a lot. They need lots of ventialtion. The screened door allows a lot of bees to ventilate without letting the bees out. I often convert them to robber screens or skunk screens by putting a notch in them and partially blocking the bottom part, but you'd want them left open for this purpose.

    Here's a picture of one that's been converted to a robber screen. You'd need them to have access to the screen but not the notch to let them out.

    http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bush/ima...enHiveSide.JPG
    http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bush/bush_bees.htm

    Of course you have to close any top entrances too. You can screen the hole on the inner cover and take the lids off too to let more air through or put a double screen board or any other kind of screening on top with the lids off to let more ventilation through.

    I figure the most critical time is when they are actually spraying. So hopefully only a day or less of confinement. It would be ideal if you could let them out before dark to relieve the stress of the ordeal.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    baltimore, md, usa
    Posts
    37

    Post

    Many thanks for the replies.
    Two questions:
    (1) Michael, does that robber screen simply get placed in the front hive entrance?; and
    (2) How do I find out more about the insecticide, herbicide, and fungicide properties as far as how long after the actual spraying there remains residue on the flowers that the bees can pick up and the likelihood of that residue translating into contaminated comb/honey? Is there any data on honey being tested for these chemicals?

    Many thanks,

    David in Baltimore

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
    Posts
    238

    Post

    pesticides are required to have this information on the label ask the applicator for a container or a copy. it describes how, when and how to use as well as when it is safe for traffic.
    Stuart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    >(1) Michael, does that robber screen simply get placed in the front hive entrance?; and

    I put it in place and staple it on with a hand stapler (JT 21 or T50 style), and you don't really want a robber screen, because you don't want the notch to let the bees out. You just want the screen door I MADE the robber screen out of. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >(2) How do I find out more about the insecticide, herbicide, and fungicide properties as far as how long after the actual spraying there remains residue on the flowers that the bees can pick up and the likelihood of that residue translating into contaminated comb/honey?

    Contamination usually isn't the big problem unless its pencap or some other kind of time release system, because most of the bees with significant amounts of pesticides don't make it back to the hive.

    >Is there any data on honey being tested for these chemicals?

    I don't know.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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