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Thread: Thymol

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    On the FGMO forum, it was asked that Dr. R's sources of thymol be given. Thats what this forum is all about, the exchange of information. You had to email Dr. R for this info, and no sources were given openly. For those such as myself who would rather have the information without actually e-mailing individuals, could someone please be open enough to direct me with sources and any specifications that may be needed.

    Is there liquid, crystal form? Pure or with additives, etc. Is this something nature stores carry? Thank-you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    831

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    Here is a recipe from a German bee institute.

    Thymol evaporation:

    Time to treat the colonies = end of July till October even when brood and Temperatures between 10º and 25º C not under or over.

    After 1 to 2 days the hive is filled up with vapor and Varroa mites starts falling of up to 10 days.

    How to treat the colonies

    Make Thymol crystals to powder with an electric coffee grinder. Warning not in the house, maybe in the garage or outside.

    Fill the powder in little plastic bags 1 – 1.5 gram. You need 0.25 gram per full frame and 1 – 1.5 gram per normal colony.
    Up to 2 gram for a very strong colony.

    Put the powder on top of the frames and don’t open the hives during the treatment time. There are approx 4 – 5 treatments necessary 5 to 7 days apart.

    With an overdose or to high temperatures bees living the hive.

    When using Thymol end of summer or early spring there is no residual in honey.

    Warning: don’t inhale the smell, after contact with skin wash immediately.

    Result: very good 90 – 95%
    =========
    Is a second ingredient like FGMO on top of this treatment necessary to reach the 100%?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

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    .

    [This message has been edited by The Honey House (edited September 15, 2003).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    I have used thyme essential oil in Fall feedings just as you would other essential oils. It does have a higher toxicity level than wintergreen, spearmint and other similar oils, so you need to cut back the amount used. The main reason I don't use it currently is that is reportedly makes the bees more agressive and irritable, and my hives are already too agressive and cranky. That's the only form of thymol I have used.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,554

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Dragonfly, I didn't know you could feed thyme to bees.

    I added thyme oil to a jar of vapo rug, melted it together and saturated cotton fabric pieces and laid this over the brood nest, and within a week, mites are dropping dead to the floor.

    It's stinks though.

    I may be noticing irritable bees but they're not being agressive.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    You can feed thyme oil in sugar syrup just as you would the other oils, but you need to have a good idea of the toxicity rates. I found a website last Summer that had a great article on various toxicity levels. If you would like the link, I will try to find the site again and post it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Dragonfly, why are you feeding thyme to the bees?

    I suppose that's the first place to start.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    After reading several articles on the use of thymol for disease and pest control in hives, I realized that thymol can be extracted from thyme plants (and is also in some of the bee balm species). Since bees seem to love working thyme and bee balm, it stands to reason, in my mind, that thymol must have some kind of usefulness in the hive, as do other essential oils from various herbs and mints, or that it is at least not harmful in the right quantities, so why not use it to help combat hive diseases and pests, namely AFB, varroa, and tracheal mites. It makes sense to me, and I don't use miticides or antibiotics in my hives.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Aegina, Greece
    Posts
    28

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    You could get some more info on this site
    www.beekeeping.com/apiguard/natural_health.htm

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