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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Jeff, Mother Nature knows fluid mechanics as well as thermodynamics.

    Last winter our low was -28F, air temperature not wind chill.
    Wind chill affects play almost no role in the clustering of bees. The outer layer of bees act as insulation for the cluster, with the heat generated from within moving out. The temperature in the hive within a few inches of the cluster is the outside ambient temperature.

    The cluster does not try to heat the hive space, they only heat the cluster's occupied space.

    As I said, my hives sit on 2x6" frames, however since I live on the top of a hill, flat ground is hard to come by. Some hives sit a foot or so off the ground.

    I have had hives blown over with the boxes spread all over and the hives survived temperatures below 0F for the overnight.

    I am not telling anyone that they have to do anything, I am simply explaining what I do and why.

    [size="1"][ November 05, 2005, 10:34 AM: Message edited by: MountainCamp ][/size]

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,736

    Post

    >I have had hives blown over with the boxes spread all over and the hives survived temperatures below 0F for the overnight.

    When I've had them blow over in those temps they all died by the next morning. But then it took 60 mph winds to blow them over. Those kinds of winds are rough and wind chill does matter some if you're out in the wind.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Greenwood, IN ,USA
    Posts
    117

    Post

    Just kidding about the aerodynamics stuff MC. I like to take the extra precaution and close everything up. It has worked for me so far and I like to stay with what works...course if I had a lot of hives it may not be an option due to time and expense. I think this is one of those "if it works for you...do it."

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Jeff, I agree with doing what works. Good luck this winter.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Wintering with Screened bottom boards

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff View Post
    I'm with the Midwest crowd on this one. I live in Indiana and we get the bitter cold with little snow and lots of wind. I reduce my bottom entrance, close my SBB's, and wrap my hives for winter and have had excellent results.
    When you say you close your SBB's, how do you actually close them up? Do you insert an IPM board which actually leaves a little bit of space for ventilation? How exactly are you "closing" your screened bottom boards? I live in Chicago and plan on reducing my entrance, wrapping the hive but I wasn't going to close the SBB other than to insert the IPM board.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Wintering with Screened bottom boards

    I made my screened bottom boards from the plans here on beesource. They include a plywood insert that slides into grooves below the screen.

    http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yo...-bottom-board/
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

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