Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,204

    Post

    >How long does it take to kill a mite in the freezer?

    I don't know what I think of destroying all the brood, but if you're going to freeze them, I'd leave them overnight.

    >What about the viruses (can they live off of the bees?).

    The infected bees will still be infected, but it's the mites that spread the virus.

    >I'd like to replace the drawn comb as soon as possible, I don't have enough.

    After freezing overnight you can put them back.

    >Fogging works even when the bees are clustered, right?

    That's what Axtman says. I've always only done it when the bees were flying.

    >If I remove brood and fog twice the hive should be virtually mite-free.

    Virtually.

    >My strong hive I won't remove brood, but I will fog.

    That's what I'd do with the strong one.

    >That means that capped brood and larva will still have mites, right?

    Yes.

    >So it is a gamble to put brood +/or bees from my strong hive into my weak hive?

    I'm guessing your strong hive is not as badly infested. There will always be mites.

    In 12 days all of the capped brood will have emerged. So if you fog three times, a week apart you will get most all of the mites that are currently in the cells.

    >If I start on mite maintenance, shouldn't I do it to help boost the population?

    I would. The other advantage is they will stay in the hive better with some live brood. Taking all of the brood out of the hive may make them want to abscond. I would put at least one frame of OPEN brood in the weak hive and I would put an excluder on the bottom board so the queen can't leave. Another frame of emerging brood wouldn't hurt.

    >I neeed to get all the honey supers off before we fog - right?

    I would.

    >One hive it is still capped (left over from the winter) but the other hive is full of fresh nectar.

    Do you have a bee escape? You could put the nectar and honey on top of a bee escpae (preferably a triagular one) and there will be few bees left in them. Then move them off, fog and when you are done put them back on.

    Be sure to stand up wind.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    OK one more question.

    If the mites kill their hosts, how long can they live off of them? In other words the capped brood that contains dead bees - does it also contain dead mites or have they already emerged or will they emerge when another bee opens the cell? Does anyone even know?

    I appreciate your thoughts on my brood death plan. The 4 frames I saw had very little new eggs and larva and lots of capped/dead brood. But there is another box that I will check out today, so I'm wondering how to decide which to kill and which to leave.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,204

    Post

    >If the mites kill their hosts, how long can they live off of them? In other words the capped brood that contains dead bees - does it also contain dead mites or have they already emerged or will they emerge when another bee opens the cell? Does anyone even know?

    Varroa mites cannot live on a dead bee. I've never seen the larvae die in the cell from the mites, nor have I heard of this. But the viruses will cripple the bee and they come out deformed. It is possible that the brood died from a chilled nest because there are not enough bees to keep the brood warm.

    >I appreciate your thoughts on my brood death plan. The 4 frames I saw had very little new eggs and larva and lots of capped/dead brood.

    Do you mean lots of dead open brood and just capped brood or brood that is capped and dead? I would not expect to see a lot of dead capped brood with varroa. I'm not trying to scare you, but if you have a lot of dead capped brood, I would test for AFB. Push a matchstick or similar sized stick, in the dead capped cell and pull it out slowly and see if it strings. If it does, you can buy test kits for AFB from all the major bee suppliers now. I don't see it in their online catalogs, but I'm pretty sure Brushy Mt, Dadant, and Mann Lake have it in their paper catalogs this year.
    http://www.kohala.net/bees/index.html#anchor400987

    Also, if they are already dead and the bees aren't cleaning out the dead brood, they will have trouble cleaning out any frames you freeze too.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    Louise: I fog ala bwrangler style. What's this about "lots of capped/dead brood" ??
    The mites are only in with the capped brood, which eventually emerge weakened/damaged but alive. Do you have uncapped dead brood? If so, why (maybe chilled brood)? If you freeze the comb (which I wouldn't do) all brood and mites will be dead.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Here is the update:

    George came over and we went through the medium hive. Lots of bees, lots of brood, nice even laying pattern, but between 2 of the boxes they had build a lot of drone comb and as I pulled frames out some of the larva were exposed. MITES! Tons of mites. I scrapped all the drone comb off, including the few cells at the bottoms of the frames.

    The weak hive is really weak. The top box had 4 frames of the irregular brood I described before and the rest capped honey from the fall with no bees. The bottom box was half empty and had a few frames of brood. So, I forced them all into the bottem box. I gave them one frame of honey and placed another full frame over the inner cover. I got rid (killed) the 4 frames of brood from the top box. My guess is that there were not enough bees to care for the brood. The brood was dried, some deformed, some with heads partly out, tongues out. No slimy matchstick though. And plenty of deformed live bees (no wings).

    Then we gassed them all (with oxalic acid). I think that went really well. By the time we hit the 3rd hive, it worked just like the descriptions. The first one went really fast and the second one shot out a wad of crystals (did it get plugged?). George has more specific details.

    Anyway, we will repeat on monday.

    Thanks everyone for all the input. It will be amazing if that weak hive makes it, but I haven't given up yet.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,204

    Post

    I would give the frozen brood combs to the strongest hive to clean out because I don't think the weak one has the workforce to do the job.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I would give the weak hive a couple of frames of brood from the strong hives.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    I wouldn’t give them sealed brood from the strong hive the disaster will start again but that’s up to you.

    The strong hive has the same problem and will crash in a few months. I would say around July if you don’t believe me make a note on you calendar and let me know that I was wrong (I know I’m not wrong).

    If the strong hive has today approx 200 mites 6 more brood circles will give them at least 7500 mites and that’s the end of July. The end of August they would have up to 20 000 mites (without any treatment) and no colony can handle that.

    The only way to make a colony stronger in this case is give them young bees (shake them) from an other colony and vaporize the same day before the transported mites can go in the cells from the weak hive.
    The only way to help is vaporize the strong hive (with the lots of mites) several times 3 or 4 days apart to kill all hatching mites or destroy the brood, vaporize and start mite free.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads