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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,217

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    Just so you don't think I'm ignoring you.

  2. #2
    BILLY BOB Guest

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    But michael what about the bees...What about the bees?!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

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    I'd be curious to know what Micheal's opinion is regarding barefoot horses.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,217

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    Mine are all barefoot.

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

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    Hey Mr. you should not be here!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

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    He just can't resist us. Probably carries a laptop and a cell phone, so he can see what we're up to.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    32

    Post

    Daisy......are you taking about "The Barefoot Trim " or just leaving your horse unshod ??

    We support the Natural Hoof (Barefoot hoofcare) and have a link to interesting info via our website.
    http://www.citorisaddles.co.nz/

    regards from Down Under..

    jim



    [This message has been edited by kimberjim (edited September 25, 2003).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

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    Micheal and Jim

    Our horses are unshod, barefoot.

    Now here's the deal. My son in law has kept them trimmed, he has read books on keeping horses unshod/barefoot.

    But, my daughter was told by a traditional cowboy that keeping her horse was more cruel then shoeing because they get stone bruises or are more prone to tripping with riders.

    Now she is concerned about what the cowboys are saying and has pressured me to get the fronts shoed.

    Well, who has the answers?

    The cowboys say a shoed horse provides a better ride, they say the horse is more confident etc.

    Our horses have never been shoed since we've owned them. Magic was barefoot when we got him and Dakota was shoed a few times before he got him when he was eight. The previous owner had him shoed once that we are aware of.

    So they're not accustomed to shoes. They have to walk over a gravel road, dependind on where the girls go...

    What are your opinions.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    32

    Post

    Hi Daisy....

    If your horse has never been shod his hooves should be as tough as nails.Alot depends on what you plan to do with him tho.Do check out the links below,there is alot of info that may be of help to you.

    We used to shoe our own horses and still do on occassion, altho not master farriers we have prolly shod 1,500 or so animals in the last 10 years and have studdied many more while developing our saddle system.
    All our horses are now kept bare foot and we would not go back to steel shoes unless forced to do so.Just keep them trimmed and you should be good to go...

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>But, my daughter was told by a traditional cowboy that keeping her horse was more cruel then shoeing because they get stone bruises or are more prone to tripping with riders.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I have heard this said over and over again but 99% of the time it dosen't hold water.It is our oppinion that most tripping, stumbling and bumble footed behavour is actually related to saddle fit...

    All things being equal,a horse that is bare foot with correctly trimmed hooves is considerably more surefooted and has far less hoof and perfomance related problems than one that is shod.
    http://www.naturalhoof.co.nz/links.html
    http://www.thehorseshoof.com/
    http://www.barefoothorse.com/

    hope this helps..

    jim


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Yes this does help very much.

    Thank You.

    We've seen horses with laminitis /foundered. It's so pitiful. I don't have the heart to take the chance of this happening to our boys.

    We go on joy rides. The girls go on the occasional trail rides across the way. We're close to an equestrian campground that has about 70 miles of trails just beyond our property. The girls don't compete, jump or barrels etc.

    The horses are like the bees and the hound dog, they're just pets.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    A wild horse naturally walks on the sole of it's foot. The hoof provides traction and a little support. The frog and the inside of the hoof is very vascular and the pressure of the ground on the sole pumps blood into the hoof and into the leg. Horses that have been shod all their lives have underdeveloped and deformed hooves, compared to wild horses, because they are walking on the hoof wall. The hoof wall was not made to support a horse. Of course your cowboy would look at a wild horses hoof and say that it is more splayed out and looks deformed to him because he's used to what a shod hoof looks like.

    When I was a kid I ran around barefoot all the time. I don't ever remember it hurting unless it was 110 out and I was walking on the blacktop. I haven't seen a stone bruise on my horses hooves.

    If I had a horse who was wearing her hooves down all the time I would be tempted to shoe them, or if the front hooves kept splitting too badly, but a few small splits are normal and how the hoof wears and breaks off as it grows.

    Mine are currently being trimmed by someone who has studied the natural angle and shape of horses hooves. I don't have the stamina to hold up my horses hooves, so I don't trim them myself. My mare weighs 1500 to 1700 pounds depending on how pregnant she is and her feet are huge. Well, a Clyde has bigger feet, but a quarter horse doesn't.

    I would say there may be a reason to sometimes shoe a horse, but most horses don't work hard enough to need it.

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