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  1. #1
    sunnyongsheng Guest

    Question

    Why not produce royal jelly in America? I'd like to know the reason.

  2. #2

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    My initial response is primarily two reasons:

    1) First, is the basic economic "law of supply and demand". The vast majority of the American population is generally not a large consumer of hive products (with the possible exception of liquid honey). And certainly anything other than honey does not have a large, broad-based demand (I'm thinking here of pollen, royal jelly and propolis). While there may be a small "niche market" (very small, specialized demand) that does bring a fairly good return of money for time invested, royal jelly production is not pursued for another reason also:

    2) American labor costs are generally prohibitive as far as the mass production of royal jelly. The labor intensive actions necessary for the production, collection and processing of royal jelly (on a large scale), does not reap a sufficiently large monetary reward that can justify common production of this product in the United States.

  3. #3
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    I've always been curious how they harvest royal jelly. It would seem like it would be ideal to have queen cell cups with little tubes that suck off most, but not all of it so the bee would keep adding it. But I doubt anyone does anything that high tech. Do they just suck it out with an eye dropper?

  4. #4

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    Michael,
    Let me first say that I've never actually been around a large scale royal jelly production unit. But it's my understanding the collection of the royal jelly kills the developing queen cell. And this may yet be another reason why it's not a very popular procedure in the U.S. - being that a finished (developed) queen would bring more money than the few cubic mm of royal jelly collected from such a cell.

  5. #5
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    I would think you could steal a little from each queen cell as they develop and the bees would make more to make up for what you take. That would seem more effecient. But I've never tried it.

  6. #6
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    Hi:
    Why not produce royal jelly in America? Yes, it¡¯s too troublesome to produce royal jelly by the traditional way. Now I have invented a series of equipments. We can use them to produce royal jelly without handwork of moving larvae, and collect the royal jelly mechanically. In America, pollination begins in April, there will be more than 10 frames of bees in the hives, and the temperature is over 15 centigrade. It¡¯s the time to produce royal jelly. A colony can produce about 50g of royal jelly one time every three days. So each colony can produce at least 2kg of royal jelly one year. In addition, we can eliminate swarming with the tools, and there is no need to examine colonies .Not only does it ensure bees do not swarm, but also it can reduce the urge of the swarm. . It can make the beekeeping management very convenient and raise the rate of propagation of bees. If we use the new methods, the procedure of beekeeping management will be improved greatly. Full play can be given to these techniques only in large apiaries with rich pollen and nectar source. I¡¯d like to popularize the new methods in America or Canada, but I don¡¯t know whether the techniques are useful or not. Would you please give me the necessary information?
    I look forward to your reply.
    Yours faithfully,
    Yongsheng.sunn .


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  7. #7
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    Yongsunn,

    You posted something similar several times and have referred several times to a new management technique that prevents swarming. Do you care to elaborate?

  8. #8
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    Michael:
    Yes, I have found a way to prevent swarming very easily. It will make the beekeeping
    management very convenient.But nobody believed it.Would you please tell me how I can find a cooperator to popularize it?
    Yongsunn

  9. #9
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    What is your goal? To popularize it? To sell it?

    To popularize it you just need several people to try it who people will listen to and if they find it works they will tell others and maybe, it will catch on.

    To make money at it, I don't think anyone has every been very successful at making money on bee ideas because beekeepers will just do it themselves, but if you have a device or equipment involved you may be able to patent it and sell it to people who won't build it themselves.

    I think the first problem is you simply state that you have this with no description of the method etc., so it's hard to know if you have something that's workable or not.

    I'd love to hear more about it.

  10. #10
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    Michael,
    The technique can be accomplished with some equipments.I am sure it will cause a great improvement of beekeeping management.It can lighten beekeepers'work greatly, and bring a large number of business for the equipment suppliers.I'm considering to patent it and I
    hope the knowledge property right can be protected well.So I'd like to find a cooperator in America or Canada.Could you kindly tell me if I can?

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  11. #11
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    >I am sure it will cause a great improvement of beekeeping management.It can lighten beekeepers'work greatly, and bring a large number of business for the equipment suppliers.I'm considering to patent it and I
    hope the knowledge property right can be protected well.So I'd like to find a cooperator in America or Canada.Could you kindly tell me if I can?

    There are several kinds of "partners" you may want to pursue.

    1) A financial business partner. Someone to invest money and share the profits.

    This would require money, so that leaves me out.

    2) A proponent with a voice. Someone who you can convince that it is a good idea who will share that opinion with the beekeeping world.

    There are a couple of people who might listen to me if I liked it, but hardly enough to matter. You really need to convince some Bee Scientists or other high profile people. A man like George Imire has a very high standing in the beekeeping community, but he is also very stubborn and opinionated and you would have a job showing a really significant improvment to convince him or anyone else like him of the advantages.

    3) A manufacturing/distribution partner who will make and market the product.

    Brushy Mt. Bee farm seems to market a lot of inovative products. You might try to sell him on the idea.

    I'd say your first obstacle is the patents. If it is patentable (in other words is not already patented and not already in common use) and you can get the patent, then you are in a better position to share the information without risking someone stealing your ideas.

    Without actualy hearing the ideas no one is going to be interested and if you tell them when you don't have the patent yet, someone may take advantage of you.

    I've heard similar claims to yours for other ideas and they all worked to some degree or another. Slatted racks and vent boxes would be two of them. Both are very useful and both greatly reduce swarming, but neither are in common use.

    Good luck.

  12. #12
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    Michael,
    Thank you very much.Would you please tell me the Email of George Imire and Brushy Mt.Bee farm?
    best wishes,
    Yongsunn

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  13. #13
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    Brushy Mt. Steve Forrest (owner) sforrest@wilkes.net

    George Imirie GlmasterBK@aol.com

    Here is George's writings http://www.beekeeper.org/

    And here is Brushy Mts web site http://www.beeequipment.com/

    As I said before, George is a hard sell. He is very opinionated but his opinions are based on years of practice and study. He is not easily conviced without definitive proof.

  14. #14
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    Michael,
    Thank you for your kind consideration.Your advice made me know how to realize my ideas.
    I am sure that I will succeed following your suggestion.
    Best wishes,
    Yongsunn

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  15. #15
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    Michael,
    Merry Christmas.

  16. #16
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    Merry Christmas.

  17. #17
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    Happy New year.

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