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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    I saw this post on Beemaster this morning. I understand that this plant is invasive in wetland areas - but to bring in another plant eating bug for this one plant? Makes me wonder what else this bug will be eating. Then the Ag community will decide they need to spray for it....

    I think it is a beautiful plant. I am nowhere near a wet land area. It is sold in the stores here. Can't it just be yanked up? Or does it have a never ending root system like Trumpet Vine or Virginia Creeper?

    Here's the post and link about the bug.
    Martha

    Posted: Fri Aug 13, 2004 3:24 pm Post subject: Purple Loosestrife, friend or foe


    I hear different things from different people. Some people say that PL is a good flavored honey, others I know, refuse it.

    I will take the wisdom of this forum as a good indication of the actual case. You are all brilliant!

    Most people, don't like the PL plant since it is very evasive in wetland areas, but I think it adds a nice purple color around things that would otherwise be green. I'm also concerend becuase I just read where there is a European Beetle being introducted to combat the loosestrife in an attempt to kill it, and it seems to be working.

    Is this something Beekeepers should be concerned with?
    http://www.ducks.ca/purple/biocontrol/biocon1.html


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Hi Martha,

    Here in Oregon we had a major problem with Tansey Ragwort. If cattle or horses eat it, it kills them. If it was in mint fields, the mint oil would be contaminated. It was finally brought under control when a moth and a beetle were introduced here. They only eat the Tansey Ragwort. The moth eats the the plant, the beetle eats the roots.

    We now have problems with scotch broom, butterfly bush and english ivy, to name just a few. Some foreign plants just don't seem to fit into an eco-system well. Purple loostrife is one of them. Here in Western Oregon (the wet part of Oregon), if Purple loostrife got loose it could wreak wetlands and streams.

    I understand that Purple loostrife is a good bee plant, but I don't think this outways its negatives.

    Pugs

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Pugs:

    What beekeeping club are you involved with?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Kennebunk, Maine
    Posts
    200

    Post

    Purple loostrife is the major nectar source for my bees this time of year. I was just down by the river near my house last weekend and it was a sea of purple. Not good for the river habitat but great for my bees.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Hi Chef,

    I haven't joined one yet. I'm going to join the Willamette Valley branch of the Oregon State Beekeepers Association. I think it meets on the fourth Monday at Chemeketa Community College. I'm going to visit the booth at the State Fair later on this month. Try and meet some people there.

    Pugs

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Pugs:

    I am going to that meeting this month. Are you?

    Are you going to the formic acid meeting on saturday in oregon city?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Hi Chef,

    I'm going to try and make the meeting this month, not the formic acid thing though. Weekday meetings are difficult for me. I much prefer weekend ones, but know must people want their weekends free.

    So, are you a chef, Chef Issac?

    Enquiring minds want to know.
    Pugs

    [This message has been edited by Pugs (edited August 14, 2004).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    White River Jct., Vermont
    Posts
    41

    Post

    HI, I have very mixed feelings about Purple Loosestrife. I am a beekeeper so I like it, because of that, but... I do think that in the long run it will be found that it will do more good than bad. It may take some time and study, but I think that its benifits will outway its 'invasiveness'. I have a good friend that runs an apairy in Vermont and he has done alot of work with the plant. You can read a little about it at his web site below. Scroll down in the news letters , about a quarter of the way, to the Dec. 2003 edition and take a look. I do admire his work with this and other plants and berries for medicinal uses. Maybe it does need to be controled a little more, but I think that it would be a mistake to try to completely 'try' to get rid of it. http://honeygardens.com/hnews.html

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