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Thread: Splitting...

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    37

    Question

    Well, my question is this; how do I split my hive to make two colonies? I'm sure that y'all have been reading the earlier posts and know the state of my hive, but when should I split them and how?

    Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    How many boxes do you have them in? I should know, I have read your earlier posts. I can only tell you what I do, based on UK practices with one box. I move the hive to one side, and place a new broodbox on the original site. I then find the queen, and put the comb with her on into the new box; I then add one comb of stores, and fill the box up with foundation and any spare combs I have. This is an artificial swarm more than a classic split; one hive gets the queen, enough brood to keep the bees from absconding, and the flying bees. The second gets the brood and young bees, and raises a new queen. If you were going to use this method with bees in multiple boxes, it would need adapting to suit, but those familiar with more prolific bees can doubtless advise.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    37

    Post

    Well, I just have one hive right now and nearly 4 weeks of experience with bees. I'm kinda looking for the most efficient way of multiplying my hives so that I dont have to buy any more bees or queens. Should I just take some frames with eggs and larva and put them into another hive with some bees to take care of them and then they will create a new queen? Thanks for any help.

    Chris

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    Once you get into summer weather - I don't know anything about your climate - take an artificial swarm and they will raise a queen in the queenless part.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    37

    Question

    If I make an artificial swarm, do I run the risk of having a queen that wont mate? I am not near any other bees as far as I know, so I am not sure what the possibility for mating will be. Maybe I will just order a new queen. Your thoughts, guys?

    Chris

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    What's the weather likely to be a month from now? I have a nuc with a cell from a hive that was making swarm preparations; in my climate it's dodgy this early. Maybe it's totally different for you. There's always a risk of the queen failing to mate, but if it fails you can either put in a frame of eggs and young brood and let them try again, or get a queen from elsewhere. If it works, and the chances are that it will, given the right timing, then you have a locally bred queen that will probably do better than one bought elsewhere.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    37

    Post

    My climate here in North Central Texas is going to be hot in the coming months. There will probably not be any days where the low temp. is under 65°F and the storm season is about to start. I have another question. I added a honey super to my hive and the super is already drawn out but has some damage fom wax moths. There are probably around 100-200 bees that I have seen walking around inside doing work, but the majority of my bees are in the hive body. Will they eventually work their way into the top? The bottom is looking like it is getting full.

    Chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    The bees will occupy the super when there are enough of them. It's usually better to put them on too soon rather than too late. How much wax moth damage is there? Are there still moths in it? It sounds as though the weather will be fine for queen mating. Only last night I was reading something which quoted a success rate of 70-80% for queen mating stations in continental Europe, which should give an idea of the chances of a queen mating successfully. Last year I lost one out of three.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

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