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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Post

    For those who have large cell and use
    herbals for their bees.

    Syrup Recipe:

    1:1 -- Sugar:Water, one gallon each.

    Heat water till just before boiling and add half teaspoon of lecithin granules. Stir and stir and stir. Add Sugar and stir.

    Add tablespoon of Wintergreen essential oil and stir. Or lemongrass or whatever......

    Prepare and Add.


    Steep in 1 c. of boiling hot water.

    2 tsp Goldenseal powder

    1 1/2 Tbls Echinacea herb/powder

    1 Tbls Usnea (or other anti-fungal herb/powder) for twenty minutes.

    Add this into the wintergreen sugar water.

    Feed one quart.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Daisy, thanks so much! I love reading your recipes. Are you just creating these concoctions as you go? It brings up thoughts for me on medicinal planting for the bees. I wonder if some of those properties are also found in the nectar? Hmmm. . .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Louise, I find stuff on the internet. But I used this recipe on my bees already and they didn't die, so I considered it safe to post. LOL

    They loved it.

    There is a sediment in it. Just pour off and try not to let the sediment in. This goes to the bottom of the jar and I don't know if it is ok or not but I try to keep it out of the jar. Unless of course you don't mind filtering, but I won't take time to do this. I don't know if some nectar is more healthier for bees or not. I think bees know which is best and go after it when it's available but in times like these with floods here and drought there, I feel better if I intervene. The bees act like they feel better too.

    This recipe if used in the spring will bring a weak hive up to a strong hive in short order. So they say.......

    Don't think I'd feed this in the winter. What would all those bees do with the energy?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I just leave what appears to be enough honey to get them through the winter.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,300

    Post

    >>I just leave what appears to be enough >>honey to get them through the winter.

    Thats what I do to.I always make sure they have a well filled medium for wintering.Thats enough where I keep bees.Fall feeding is for those late splits that have lots of bees but are short on honey,and those prolific young Italians that manage to eat eat it up raising late brood.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    BAD Italians. Hahaha

    Theres a reason I dont keep many of them around, at least not in the pure form.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    1,262

    Smile

    Thanks for the information....

    From six hives I took about twenty pounds of honey. That was in mid July. The hives have a bunch of honey for their winter stores.

    Louis, I think nectar and such does vary from plant to plant. I did a little search and found a link that may show this.
    http://www.beedata.com/apis-uk/newsl...pis-uk0702.htm

    Here's a snip....

    ANTIOXIDANT HONEY.
    Antioxidants are compounds found in cells that mop up free radicals, the damaging side products of normal metabolism. Experts believe that diets rich in antioxidants like Vits C and E may help to prevent certain diseases such as heart disease and cancer.
    In a research report from the University of Illinois, honey was found to be a source of these antioxidants with levels varying from low to moderate. All honeys were definitely not equal in this respect and it was found for example that honey from bees fed on Illinois buckwheat had 20 times the antioxidant level than honey from bees foraging on Californian sage. In fact one scientist noted that bite for bite, the antioxidant level in the buckwheat honey compared favourably with the ascorbic acid related antioxidant in tomatoes. For more details on this, see:
    http://www.cyberbee.net/antiox.htm

    I have one hive that's low in numbers, I'm going to look at the brood pattern and give them the concoction tomarrow. If it's a queen problem I may just combine......

    Then we'll have five hives.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,300

    Post

    BAD Italians. Hahaha

    I would agree with that if I didnt go to almonds.It just seems easier to get the bees if they are Italians or mostly Italian.It does get scary to load a hive on the truck that is boiling over with bees but not much weight.The more Carn ,the heavier the hive and some of them will have just as many bees as the Italians.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    My echinacea is in full bloom right now. I'll check it out tomorrow.

  10. #10

    Post

    Hi Daisy
    I use wintergreen oils for about 5 yrs now and found that mixing sugar water and oils don't mix well and the last of the treatment is strong with wintergreen oilos and kills some bees.
    I take old honey and mix wintergreen oil in it and it stays mixed.
    also I use eucalyptus oils for the treatment of wax mothes=works well

    Don

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Don, are you using the eucalyptus oils in the hives or for storage?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Daisy, what is your grease patty recipe? You use olive oil instead of Crisco right?

  13. #13
    Hi Louise
    I use the oil in honey to prevent wax moths at the rate of 15 drops to a quart of honey feed thru a hive top feeder or at the entrence a tablespoon every week.
    haveing goo luck no wax moths for yrs.
    Don

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    fat beeman, I use boardman feeders and I can see the mixture in the glass and if some oils didn't get suspended in the lecithin granules, then Yes that oil will kill the bees when it dumps the last amount from the jar.

    This doesn't happen if the oils don't separate in the lecithin mixture and it's good that people know this so I'm glad you mentioned it.

    There can be no concentrated oil, oil separated from the water, allowed.

    Louise, I don't have any specific recipe, I just dump confectioner sugar in a small bowl, with only six hives, I use a small bowl, I add enough olive oil to give it a stiff mixture so that it's not oozing oils but soft. Then I add the treatment oils to it. Thirty drops is closer to what I use to treat six hives from a cereal bowl half full of the mixed mixture.

    Fatbeeman, do you think I should "mix the oils in a little honey" before adding this into my mixture? I'm going to try this because the oils alone change the texture somewhat of my patties. (You'd have to try to see what I mean......)

    Louise, I'm not going to put grease/oil patties in my hives in the winter. I will use them in the spring thru late summer/early fall only.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Thanks for the info Daisy & Fat Beeman. I'll let you know how it goes.

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