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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    22

    Post

    NewBee here with a question. I'm just beginning, and looking at various catalogs from which to buy my first (2) hives for this spring. I'll be taking a class locally, and I'm reading everything I can.
    My plan is to use 8 frame mediums and small cell foundation, thanks entirely to the info I've gleaned from my readings on this site (huge thanks to all).
    I was looking at the Brushy Mtn website for 8 frame equipment, and they use the term "Garden Hive" or "English Garden Hive" for some 8 frame equipment. Is this a unique thing, or do they just mean 8 frame?
    Thanks to anyone who can shed some light on this.
    Samantha
    Stamford, CT

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Their concept of a Garden hive is one that is all eight frame, but not necessarily all mediums. I'd check the description and if it doesn't say all mediums, I'd call and check. But the "complete kit" will have plastic foundation (not small cell) and a lot of other things you don't need. It will also have a very pretty roof that is unnecessary.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    If I were to get back to a couple colonies
    I would for sure get the garden hive. They
    are gorgeous, especially the copper roofed
    ones.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >It will also have a very pretty roof that is unnecessary.

    They are attractive, but you can't set your smoker on top, or a glass of lemonade or cup of coffee. You can't turn the roof upside down on the ground and set hive bodies on it. They're also rather expensive. I have one, it came with a hive somebody gave me. I wouldn't have bought it, but now that I have it, I suppose I'll put it on my er.. garden hive [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I have been thinking of building one for
    the back yard.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Post

    I don't have one, but I looked a them. I am hobbyist with one, going on three hives. I think that George summed it up--very pretty, very expensive, and not too practical outside of the aesthetic. I suggest buying the standard hive, and use your creativity to paint it. Look into HSC for your small cell if you want fully drawn plastic frames. If you want SC wax foundation, contact Peggjam from this site. He has an excellent reputation for making it. You can make the standard boxes into 8 frame with an adapter. Michael Bush has written guides on how to do this and is a big proponent of it.
    Hobbyist

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Charleston, WV
    Posts
    172

    Post

    I agree with RonS and George too. I always set brood boxes (when I break apart a hive) on my overturned outer cover. You can't do that with the fancy roof of a garden hive. You probably don't to set the box in the grass as the propolis, wax, etc will gather grass, dirt, etc pretty easily. While this probably doesn't amount to much for the bees, it won't look too good...which is the goal of the garden hives. Just my opinion of course but a good pain job does wonders

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Chester NH
    Posts
    24

    Post

    I got a garden hive kit last year,it came with all medium supers it looks so cool, I did not used the frames which came with it and got new frames with sc foundation, so have a cupboard full of unused frames which i will use one day i suposse, when i break my hive down i just put my supers on my inner cover insted of the telescoping top. My problem this year is i now want to increase the number of hives but dont want to spend all that money on the copper tops and it will look funny with one and the rest being plain. Good luck with your hive John
    have fun

  9. #9

    Post

    Hi, I am running all eight frame mediums with the copper peaked roofs from Brushy Mountain, and I love them! I did not purchase the "kit", because I wanted all real wood and real wax, no plastic. So I ordered the bits to build the brood and super boxes (really the exact same thing) and made my own ...you can see them on my website, link below.

    The copper roofs may be more expensive, but it warms my heart every time I look at them, and that, my friends, is Pricless... Wishing you joy in your beekeeping Donna Marie

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Post

    "Real wood and real wax"; NO PLASTIC!! "Warms my heart every time I look at them". PRICLESS!! WHOOO! HOO!! for YOU!. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    George for once is right.

    I have heard of some garden hives with the copper top being struck by lightning, and beekeepers losing all the bees as the hive was literally blown to pieces from the bolt of lightning.

    Now that would be priceless.

    I also have heard that the copper top interfers with the bees eye sight and natural homing ability as it messes with the earths magnetic lines. Bees may come out and get disoriented and not find thier way back.....

    Do not miss the warnings that come with these copper top garden hives. It states very clearly that such a hive should not be used within 200 feet of power lines. And for the older beekeepers, do not work such a hive if you have a pace maker.


    (Easy george...let it go.....)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Donna every time I see your hives I am
    in awe. Absolutely gorgeous!!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    McLeansville NC
    Posts
    448

    Post

    No warning came with my hive top. And as for the danger of getting struck by lightning, I know of several houses, comercial structures, and other buildings that incorporate copper, and they are not getting struck by lightning and exploding or burning to the ground. Being that the bee hive is low to the ground, it goes against physics to say it would be as a lightning rod. I would have to say it is no less attracting to lightning than the metal sheeting used on a standard top.

    As for the homing ability of the bees, ????????????. I would doubt it but who knows.

    Just my opinion.

    [size="1"][ January 23, 2007, 07:29 PM: Message edited by: Ron Young ][/size]
    Ron

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    >I have heard of some garden hives with the copper top being struck by lightning

    foo, foo
    no problem
    just setup one of those invisible dog fence things with the wire that runs around in a big loop and everything within 5 miles will be protected since the lightning will always hit the fence
    Don't ask me how I know

    Dave

  15. #15

    Post

    Thank you Sundance! And Samantha, how great you are starting with small cell foundation! One of my colonies is on that foundation exclusively and doing great, the other I have fed frames of SC in early spring. Plan on adding two more colonies from SC mediums nucs from Fatbeeman in spring.

    Very exciting!

    PS Harvested 75 pounds of honey from Francesca last July, copper tops and all!

    Cheers D

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >George for once is right. [Wink]

    And Bjorn is once again, correct [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Donna, your hives are, as I have said before, just gorgeous.

    >I have heard of some garden hives with the copper top being struck by lightning,

    So why should copper roofed hive lids be more susceptible to being struck by lightning than regular zinc-coated sheet metal roofs like I have on my hives?

    >I also have heard that the copper top interfers with the bees eye sight and natural homing ability

    My leg is getting sore..

    >(Easy george...let it go.....) [Roll Eyes]

    But... but... Oh... OK.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    22

    Post

    Thanks to everyone for their generous, informed replies. I don't think I'm going to get the copper tops, for my hives, but they are beautiful.
    I really appreciate everyone's expertise regarding the small cell. I wouldn't have had the guts to start with it if it weren't for all the encouraging words on this board.
    I'm going to my first meeting of our backyard beekeepers association next week, and I'm really excited to learn more about what's done around here locally.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Newtown,
    I hope my input did not sway your decision. I hoped some could see through a good gag as george did. There are no lightning or other hazards. Just wanted to make sure nobody took it too serious.

    As George did comment, I find the top hard to deal with. You can't place anything on them, and beyond looks, they are very non-practical. But they do look nice!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Post

    For what it's worth, I bought a few copper tops last year, kind of a treat to myself because I just liked how they looked. I still carry an old flat top out with me to use as a table, but that effort does not bother me.

    One advantage is that the tops are heavier and less likely to blow off in a storm.

    And, Bjorn, if your hives are stacked so high that lightning strikes are a problem, I would be interested in knowing how you get the honey supers off! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    22

    Post

    I decided not to go with the copper tops for practicality reasons. There's so much else to buy to get this endeavor begun I figured that beauty can wait.
    Thanks again,
    Sam

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