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Thread: New neighbors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
    Posts
    474

    Post

    Would like to get some advice.
    We had some folks build a house 3/4 miles from us,plant about 1000 apple/fruit trees 2 years ago.
    Now I see a pile of boxes(maybe 70-80) stacked up outside.
    I'm a newbee, with 3 hives going good, and have plans to increace to 9 this year,would someday like ALOT [img]smile.gif[/img]
    I have treated my bees "by the book" as to disease and pest management,but am not happy with this approach, and will be trying out some of good stuff I have been picking up here,even though I may loose my friend and mentors help/approval.
    The thing is do you guys feel that I have any moral duty to another beekeeper(and viceaversa)to manage my bees the way "your supposed to", or can I go biological? I'm talking small cell,hygenic queens,drone comb,etc.
    I have met the fellow,and I really doubt he could be convinced to go natural.
    Would like to know what you all think I shold do. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,373

    Post

    I'd be more worried about what your bees are going to find and drag home from all those boxes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Post

    I agree, I'd be more worried about what your's bring back than what their's will get from yours.

    Also, MOST people with fruit trees spray insecticides and I would worry about that.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,479

    Post

    >>manage my bees the way "your supposed to", or can I go biological?

    Should be nothing to stop you from doing just that. You although have a moral duty to your neighbouring beekeepers to try to keep your hives as clean as can, to decrease cross infections ect.

    >>"your supposed to",

    I beleive the books are mearly suggesting how to manage your pests and diseases based on the most reacent science availiable, there is no one way to manage your pests/diseases in your hives. But you must be practical. If you are going to start regressing, you should continue testing, and make certain your pests are under control. Otherwise you can fall back on chem treatments for your hives sake and your neighbours.
    I would not give up on the AFB treatments.

    >>loose my friend and mentors help/approval.

    They are your bees. Consider his suggestions, but otherwise beekeep in the manner you feel fit. YOu can always fall back on his suggestions if your experimentations dont fit
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,479

    Post

    >>MOST people with fruit trees spray insecticides and I would worry about that.

    True, it is a concern to your bees. But If he has bees also, there will be more of an understanding and respect for the bees in the area. I'm sure he will notify you of any insecticidal use.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I've been completely chem-free for 5 years now. I use russians for mite resistance, and brood comb replacement (about every 5 years) for AFB prevention.

    I bought a nuc a few years ago, and it came down with EFB the next year. All I did was replace the 2 old frames that came with the nuc, with new ones, and the EFB cleared right up. I know that wouldn't happen with AFB... but keeping new brood comb PREVENTS AFB, whereas terramyacin only delays getting AFB. So, the "biological" approach to beekeeping, in my opinion, is healthier than the chemical approach.

  7. #7

    Post

    I like eating fruit and grow as much as I can. I Use insecticide as needed and plan to continue with same. My bees have not apparently suffered. Anyone that grows fruit with any knowledge or sense of profiteering will know to not spray when plants are in bloom, the time when bees will be visiting to make nice beautiful fruit.

    I would not worry about the mentor or the neighbor. Not a good mentor if he won't hear you. Unsolicited advice for the neighbor will not be heard, better to be a good friend. You might learn and influence each other.

    This ain't rocket science.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Not producing a strain of "resistant" mites might be a nice thing to do for a neighbor beekeeper.

    If your hives are clean, what could you be doing to effect his/hers? I do think that we have a resposibility to monitor our hives, not just for the sake of our neighbors, but for our own bees. And I'm sure you would be doing that anyway.

    WayaCoyote
    WayaCoyote

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