Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
    Posts
    18

    Post

    After a warm winter, I've a colony that must have done well. It swarmed a couple weeks ago and we caught it. I haven't the time to work my hives so my husband has kind of taken over. I know it's harder for the bees that way but for now, it's the way it is around here... (long story, I had a baby, haven't had any time to do anything) Anyway, the hive swarmed again and it looks big. But it's probably 25 feet above in a tree. Will it eventually find it's way to the hive box with the lure in it my husband set out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Probably a fifty fifty chance in my estimation.You do not state as to when it swarmed--today, yesterday?
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,339

    Post

    >Will it eventually find it's way to the hive box with the lure in it my husband set out?

    I'm with powernapper. I'd say 50/50. It will or it won't. How long they stay. Most swarms happen in the middle of the morning and most of them leave by the middle of the afternoon. Occasionally they stay more than a day and even more rarely they never leave and build comb on the branches. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    I would rig a bucket and try to get them down. Putting them in the hive is a much better bet.

    http://www.beeequipment.com/products.asp?pcode=270
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
    Posts
    18

    Post

    They swarmed yesterday, (Thursday). They are so high up we can't possible get to them.
    However, my husband has reserved a lift to cut some branches from other trees but it won't be till Monday.

  5. #5

    Post

    Unless its rainy for the weekend its a long shot they will be there sat noon.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
    Posts
    18

    Post

    where will they go?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Although it can happen, I wouldn’t count on the swarm finding it’s way to any swarm trap or hive within 300 yards, swarms prefer to select a home further in distance.

    During night time:
    I would take my bow, and using my practice tips shoot a string over the branch. A quick yank on the string will send them directly to the ground without much flying. Most here might suggest to use a shoot gun, but I’m an archery kinda guy.

    Or during mid morning:
    Another possibility since you have nasonov is to grab an empty comb and wire tie your lure to the frame and extend it up against the swarm using a long pole. If you can manage to hold the pole steady, the swarm ’may’ crawl onto the comb. Better yet, if you can mange to cut the branch the bees are on or shake it, they will want to fly back to the place that they were, so make sure the comb is held at the origonal spot or against the branch where the swarm was located.

    Sometimes a frame with a small patch of eggs taken from another colony is something the queen and swarm can’t resist crawling on to, but I would opt not to use a large frame of brood because it may get chilled in the process.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
    Posts
    18

    Post

    "Although it can happen, I wouldn’t count on the swarm finding it’s way to any swarm trap or hive within 300 yards, swarms prefer to select a home further in distance."

    ---Does this mean they will just leave? Go find a woodpile in a nieghbors yard?

    "During night time:
    I would take my bow, and using my practice tips shoot a string over the branch. A quick yank on the string will send them directly to the ground without much flying. Most here might suggest to use a shoot gun, but I’m an archery kinda guy."

    ---It's funny.. we had thought to do that since my husband bow hunts.. I suggested sending a line over the branch and then yanking it down to a can or box. It's just that it's soo far up.

    "Or during mid morning:
    Another possibility since you have nasonov is to grab an empty comb and wire tie your lure to the frame and extend it up against the swarm using a long pole. If you can manage to hold the pole steady, the swarm ’may’ crawl onto the comb. Better yet, if you can mange to cut the branch the bees are on or shake it, they will want to fly back to the place that they were, so make sure the comb is held at the origonal spot or against the branch where the swarm was located.

    Sometimes a frame with a small patch of eggs taken from another colony is something the queen and swarm can’t resist crawling on to, but I would opt not to use a large frame of brood because it may get chilled in the process."

    ---It's supposed to be warm again here tomorrow.. it may be our only option.

    Thanks!

    [size="1"][ April 14, 2006, 08:34 PM: Message edited by: RubyBee ][/size]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,339

    Post

    >---Does this mean they will just leave? Go find a woodpile in a nieghbors yard?

    Probably a hollow tree or a wall with an access hole somewhere about 1/4 mile away.

    >---It's funny.. we had thought to do that since my husband bow hunts.. I suggested sending a line over the branch and then yanking it down to a can or box. It's just that it's soo far up.

    Which is why I like the bucket arrangment. I don't like being that far up a ladder dealing with bees. It's too easy to panic.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Where will it go? Maybe someones chimney, maybe a big bird house, maybe some ones empty hive, maybe some ones shed, dog box, attic, or wall--or an old hollow tree. No way of knowing.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    edmonds, WA, USA
    Posts
    348

    Post

    They stay longer if the weather is cold and wet. I have had them come to my bait hives only 2 out of 10 tries. My bees sometime swarm into the big fir trees, 60 feet up. I hate that!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    --My bees sometime swarm into the big fir trees, 60 feet up. I hate that!

    Tie a nasonov lure or a vial stuffed with cotton and soaked with lemongrass oil to a low hanging branch toward the direction of the prevailing wind from your hives. Secure it to a thick dark tree branch, bunch of leaves or other such highly visible object. Find a location that will also enable it to be positioned between 6 to 10 feet off the ground that you think would serve as an attractable clustering site. This seems to aid the tendency for the bees to land in a particular area where they can be easily retrieved.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads