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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5

    Question

    This being my very first year in bees, I was looking at saving a bit of
    money as I have to buy everything from the ground up. I have been offered an extensive
    collection of used equipment from a person who has quit the hobby. There
    is absolutely everything I will need from hives and frames right up to
    an extractor and bottling pails. My dilemna is that some of the frames
    have wax-moth damage. There is about 160 frames total, with about 50
    clean, 50 needing cleaning and the remainder needing the foundation
    replaced. Should I pass on this stuff because of the wax-moth?? Can I
    remove the crap and flame-sterilize everything?? It still is a good deal
    but the guy wants to sell it all together. Thanks for any help, Glen
    Archer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,329

    Exclamation

    Hello Glen -

    The wax moth damage should be your least concern of the package deal. Remove the worst of it and replace with new foundation. Chewed frames won't matter much to the bees either. A good hive will clean up the rest.

    I would think hard about the idea of saving some money to get a collection of equipment. You always run the risk of obtaining diseased equipment. Unless you know the individual and his practices and are quite sure he hasn't put misused chemicals in the hives, I'd pass on the woodenware but take everything else. You could lessen the risk some I suppose, if you decided to trash all the comb, clean all the wood and start with new foundation on everything. It will be a good deal for you if no problems arise but a kick in the behind if you buy foulbrood.

    Regards,
    Barry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Naples, Maine
    Posts
    41

    Lightbulb

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barry:
    Hello Glen -

    The wax moth damage should be your least concern of the package deal. Remove the worst of it and replace with new foundation. Chewed frames won't matter much to the bees either. A good hive will clean up the rest.

    I would think hard about the idea of saving some money to get a collection of equipment. You always run the risk of obtaining diseased equipment. Unless you know the individual and his practices and are quite sure he hasn't put misused chemicals in the hives, I'd pass on the woodenware but take everything else. You could lessen the risk some I suppose, if you decided to trash all the comb, clean all the wood and start with new foundation on everything. It will be a good deal for you if no problems arise but a kick in the behind if you buy foulbrood.

    Regards,
    Barry
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Good Morning !!
    I took a beginner's beekeeping course here in Maine a few years ago and learned that one idea to consider would be to have the local State Bee Inspector (if you have one) or contact a local Master Beekeeper to inspect all the equipment. DO THIS BEFORE YOU BUY THE EQUIPMENT. As I have been told, scorching may only be partially effective in stopping AFB or EFB. Generally, I was told that equipment contaminated with EFB or AFB must be completely burned. That's why it would help you to have it inspected BEFORE you plunk down any hard-earned money and then see it go up in smoke. As previously mentioned, be cautious. ALso, if the comb in all frames looks chewed and beat up, you may want to start with fresh foundation in all the frames (after inspection for AFB & EFB).

    Good Luck
    Paul Bilodeau


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Big Grin

    Hi folks
    Here comes that : whatever its worth department.
    I was invaded by Afb from outside sources, that is Drifting bees from the neighborhood.2 Colonies were affected as determined by the inspector.
    On his suggestion I removed the bees and planted them in a different hive.
    Terramycin/ sugar water solution was sprayed over the bees twice a day for 5 days. In addition Powder sugar / terramycin mix was spread over the top of the frames.This treatment was sufficient for the bees to regain health.
    The contaminated boxes were torched and boiled in a Lye solution for about 1/2 hour.
    The combs were burned. The frames were also boiled in the same solution.
    I had no afb since that incident 5 years ago.
    The important item is the Proper terramycin application as it applies to all antibiotics. Nowadays it is not required to burn all your stuff .
    Two other very positive methods of spore distruction is Radiation as it is practiced in Australia or the wood is boiled in Paraffin for 10 min at 260 Deg F.
    But , of course , you can also burn the whole schmear.
    The presence of AFB in used equipment can be determined by careful inspection. This knowledge can be found in the various bee websites .
    Let your mouse do the walking
    Best of luck
    Catfish

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Me again, Folks! Well, our provincial inspector has reccomended an inspection, and until he gives the okay the fellow who is selling the stuff is going to keep it. I am getting my nucs the last week of May and I have enough supers, frames etc. to get started. Thanks for everyones input, Glen.

  6. #6
    Pollinator Guest

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