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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    79

    Question

    As some of you know, I have 2 hives, and one is excelling, while the other is doing nothing. I cut out some of the cross comb (comb going sideways in the hive), but left about 4 frames worth so as to not destroy anymore eggs and the queen if I didn't see her. Well, this hive is really suffering now, and wax moths have gotten into it. I was wondering if I should shake some bees in from the strong hive, and put more frames in with good foundation and built comb? The other option would be to wait until the spring, see if the hive makes it through the winter, and then try making a new queen through a nuc and expanding that way. Which would be best?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    As some of you know, I have 2 hives, and one is excelling, while the other is doing nothing. I cut out some of the cross comb (comb going sideways in the hive), but left about 4 frames worth so as to not destroy anymore eggs and the queen if I didn't see her. Well, this hive is really suffering now, and wax moths have gotten into it. I was wondering if I should shake some bees in from the strong hive, and put more frames in with good foundation and built comb? The other option would be to wait until the spring, see if the hive makes it through the winter, and then try making a new queen through a nuc and expanding that way. Which would be best?

    Reply:
    Get into the colony and clean the bottom board of wax worms residues and also clean any frames that can be salvaged of them too. If you cannot salvage frames with the wax worms as too eaten up, then pull them and put in new and/or drawn combs.

    Also yes add bees to the colony by taking frames of brood from your other colony (not with queen on) and shaking the nurse bees into the colony to help it get strength. Also add a fresh frame of open eggs and larva and one sealed from the strong colony with accompanying bees but not the queen.

    Then Watch and report back as to how they raise a new queen in about 3 weeks.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    ONe more thing, don't shake all the nurse bees out of the strong colony. Just about from 1/3 of the brood frames.

    Chow

    Dee-

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    79

    Question

    Should I get rid of all the cross comb frames? There are still 4 in there that the combs go crosswise on. Also, if I get rid of them, do I just put them on a brood chamber above, or do I shake all the bees out and totally discard it?

    Thanks,
    Oscar

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Oscar,

    I got some hives about 3 weeks ago and three of them had wax moths. I took this oportunity to shake down the three hives on to 4.9 mm foundation. Took the old frames and put them in the freezer.

    The moths are gone and the hives are doing great! You can still add a fresh frame of open eggs and larva to your new "swarm" also.

    Billy Bob

    [This message has been edited by BILLY BOB (edited July 25, 2002).]

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