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Thread: Hive Placement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Creal Springs IL
    Posts
    9

    Post

    We have approx. 13 acres divided by a tree line sectioning off about 3 of those acres the back third of which is woods. The east border is our homestead, the west border is a tree line and the north border is a tree line. The south border is a tree line next to a road. We have numerous low spots which hold water (clay ground). The terrain is extremely rolling. Where do we place our hives? We plan to start with only two.

  2. #2

    Post

    Hi

    I would put it on the south side of the north tree line. Put it on the higher ground so there is good air ventalation but not windy. Does the West and north treeline meet? If they do that is great so you do not get a summer afternoon bake with the hives.

  3. #3
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    You want the hives to have the morning sun at the front. Anything close to faceing East or Southeast. What you are looking for is letting the back of the hive take the bad weather, the rain and wind will generaly be comming from the West, Northwest.

    I agree with rainesridgefarm, try and keep the back of you hives close to the tree line so in the summer they will have shade. It would be nice if the trees are hardwoods, or ones that loose the leaves in the winter. Then the hives will get the afternoon sun when the weather is cold.

    I'd keep the hives as far away from the low/wet spots as I could. Dampness is big trouble for a bee hive. Several diseases can develop inside you hives if they are subject to to much dampness. The hives need to tilt forward so any water that gets into the hive will go out the front.

    BB

    [This message has been edited by BILLY BOB (edited December 29, 2003).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Doesnt seem like we often have many choices on where to put them but if I had a choice I would want two things....no low spots to collect water or cold air and something to block the predominant wind.

    Sounds like you have many options. I would pass on the low spots but maybe you could try a few other spots and see what works good.

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    One more thing! It is alway easier if we know where you are from to answer your questions. Honey bees will be kept differently depending on what reagon of the country/world you are in.(we do have members from other countrys).

    Thanks

    BB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

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    I used to try to get some shade in the afternoon, but discovered here (in Nebraska) they produce much better in full sun. I do try to face them east or south or something between. The prevailing storms here are from the west, north or northwest.

    From what I've seen they do fine where ever I put them in Nebraska, but people in cool and really humid climates find they NEED sun to keep the chalkbrood away.

    You will probably get better answers if we know where you live.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,777

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    >>they produce much better in full sun.

    I find that too Micheal. I like to keep my hives in full sun, but it doesent always work that way. I heard somewhere that hives in full sun were less likly to fall from mite infection than shaded hives. Might just be some optomistic talk.
    Shelter is most important up here from the North and West winds. I like to have a southern eastern exposture, to wake them up for early work.

    Ian

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    We have a couple weeks of above 100F in late July early August. I was told it is best that the hive is shaded mid day and mid day only. This makes it somewhat hard to find a spot. I have my hive on the outside edge of a large oak. They are shaded from 11:30-2:00.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

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    >I find that too Micheal. I like to keep my hives in full sun, but it doesent always work that way. I heard somewhere that hives in full sun were less likly to fall from mite infection than shaded hives. Might just be some optomistic talk.

    There have been a number of studies that show that slightly higher temps in the hives increase the varroa drop and decrease the varroa reproduction rate. Not significant enough to be a stand alone method of handling mites, but significant enough to add up when doing Integrated Pest Managment.

    >Shelter is most important up here from the North and West winds. I like to have a southern eastern exposture, to wake them up for early work.

    I do worry about storms especially in winter. I like some shelter and I like them facing with their back to the wind.

    >We have a couple weeks of above 100F in late July early August. I was told it is best that the hive is shaded mid day and mid day only. This makes it somewhat hard to find a spot. I have my hive on the outside edge of a large oak. They are shaded from 11:30-2:00.

    Certainly in places where it gets extremely hot for long periods of time it may be different than it is here. I have heard of comb collapse in hives in full sun in hotter climates. It's never been a problem for me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Creal Springs IL
    Posts
    9

    Post

    Thanks for all your advice so far. It pretty much confirmed what I thought. Sorry I didn't specify that we are in Southern Illinois, which means warm, humid summers, especially July and August.

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