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  1. Post

    This is my first real year as a beekeeper and I wanted to learn as much as possible so I put in an observation hive IN MY LIVING ROOM. Yes, it's right next to my new bed...the couch. My wife is coming around though so I hope to move back in my old bedroom soon .

    Anyway, I thought you might like to see some pictures of my setup. Here's the link to my website that has the photos:
    http://www.honeybeesonly.com/index.p...acc35631741843

    Let me know what you think....

    Ken

    ------------------
    Check me out at: http://honeybeesonly.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    Kool pics,

    When did you put your OB hive in??
    Did you use brood frames from an existing hive to get started??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    After 28 years, I finally set one up in my living room two years ago. I wish I'd done it 30 years ago. I have learned much watching them. And the "bee channel" is much more interesting than anything I have on Statellite TV.

    Your's is pretty small. Hope it winters well. I think it might if you let it get very overpopulated late in the fall and feed all winter. Don't cut the size down too much late in the summer. You may even have to shake some bees out without pulling a frame late in the summer so you don't set them back TOO much coming into winter.

  4. Post

    actually it went in just like a new hive. i put one pound of the bees from a four pound package of bees and then introduced a queen. the hive has two frames, a deep and a shallow. i used plastic foundation.

    i got the bees on april 13th and put them in the OH on april the 14th.

    i'm going to post some more recent pictures soon...so check back. the current population is about triple what it was initially...the top frame is aobut 1/3 full of nearly capped honey.

    ken

    ------------------
    Check me out at: http://honeybeesonly.com

  5. Post

    Michael...I'm actually not planning on wintering them in this observation hive. I'm actually going to be introducing them to a hive tomorrow. I was hoping to get some new pictures on my website by now but I just haven't yet. As soon as I do I'll let you know.

    i did post some more pictures of our bee yard...you can check them out here: http://www.honeybeesonly.com/index.p...m_cat&cat_id=2

    Ken

    ------------------
    Check me out at: http://honeybeesonly.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    You're moving them OUT of the observation hive already? I'd leave them until fall. They are too much fun to watch!

  7. Post

    unfortunately with only two frames (a deep and a medium) they are already packed in and i've noticed swarming preparations...i'm tempted to let them swarm and see that happen but my lust for honey makes me want to put them in a real hive and let them get to work.

    what do you think i should do?

    ------------------
    Check me out at: http://honeybeesonly.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    You could de-queen them, and watch them re-queen themselves. It'll slow down the population growth, but they could pack it full of honey with no brood to feed.

  9. Post

    i actually considered this (de-queening them) just to see them re-queen it. something about killing a perfectly good queen ($10) is hard to do.

    what about removing the brood frame and putting it in an established hive and replacing it with a clean frame and let them start again? would that work? would the new hive care for this 'foreign' frame of brood?

    ken

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Why dont' you build a larger observation hive for them?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    You have lots of choices. You could make a split from one of your hives and put the queen in that and let the observation hive raise a new queen.

    I always need a good young queen somewhere. Any queen over 2 that isn't awsome is worth replacing, so you could use the observation hive to requeen another hive and let them raise one.

    You could let them swarm and watch the preparations. My guess is you'll learn a lot from that.

    You could pull a frame and put it in a regular hive and let them build back up.

    You could build a larger observation hive.



  12. Post

    thanks for all the advice on what to do with my observation hive. in the end i decided to remove it and combine it with a weak hive. i did this on saturday. next year i will try some of the suggestion made here.

    i will so to anyone who is a beekeeper and has never had an observation hive it's a great way to learn and to share with others this great hobby of beekeeping.

    was it you michael that called it 'Bee TV' that's a great description because we would find ourself watching it was sweeps week!

    thanks again,

    ken

    ------------------
    Good friends are sweet as honey. Winnie the Pooh
    http://honeybeesonly.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    It was me. But I'd have to give the credit to my daughter. We have the Bee channel, the Horse channel, the Chicken channel...

    All of them are more interesting than regular TV and cheaper to maintain than Cable.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    The plans in this site for an observation hive are for a 3 frame (2 deep one medium) stacked vertically). That makes it a very tall "building". Has anybody tried a 2 frames tall observation hive (2 deep frames) that is also 2 frames in depth (making it a 4 frames total)? I guess some of the bee's activity would remain hidden from observation but the maintenance work would be reduced. It would also make it a slightly more natural home for the bees. Does this make sense to the experts? I have yet to convice my wife about an observation hive in the living room (and from some of your experiences the consequences are dire if going ahead without spouse consent) but the less it needs to be opened the better the chances to convince her.

    Jorge

  15. Post

    Jorge...if you looked at my OH you'll see that it's a two frame version...only single deep. the bees quickly out grew it and i was forced to do something...they were showing swarming signs (they had started building queen cups...i have some pretty good pictures of this). I've seen some of those multi-frame vertial OHs and I worry about stability.

    I'd be interested in seeing some alternatives also. Anyone?

    Ken

    ------------------
    Good friends are sweet as honey. Winnie the Pooh
    http://honeybeesonly.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    Jorge,

    I made my OBS hive from the plans on this site. but I modified it to hold (5) deep frames. It only stands about 50" tall and 22" wide. Its great watching the queen do her thing and the rest of them doing their thing too!!!

    you can see it at http://oregonsparkie.tripod.com/

    [This message has been edited by oregonsparkie (edited June 05, 2004).]

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I think you'll like it better one frame deep. When they build swarm cells you can see it. The queen should always be visible, where with a two frame deep she will USUALLY be between the two frames where you can't see her.

    I think three mediums is about the minimun size I'd try to keep year round. Because they get tall and I'm afraid of them falling, not to mention you have to carry it in and out of the house, I think three deeps or four mediums is about as tall as I'd want to get. I have two right now that are four mediums. I have one that is one medium and an extra shallow. That one has not done very well. It's just too small to get established well.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    HBO, are you the one who offered to upload pics to your place?

    I'm thinkin bout Jones-in... LOL

    If I can just find my digital!

    It was just in the kitchen the other day.........


  19. Post

    daisy...yes, you can upload pictures on my website...i'm thinking i missed something (jones in?). anyway...yes, it was me and the offer is still good.

    ken

    ------------------
    Good friends are sweet as honey. Winnie the Pooh
    http://honeybeesonly.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    M. B. Where do yoiu get the Bee Channel????????? Is it on The Dish Network???????? Dale

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