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Type: Posts; User: peterloringborst

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  1. Replies
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    Re: What is going on with this?

    This is nonsense.
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    Re: What is going on with this?

    I would not assume anything. I would treat for mites ASAP and hope for the best. Adding terramycin into the mix at this point is probably a good idea, if you are so inclined.

    It might clear up by...
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    Re: What is going on with this?

    Exactly. Same here.

    By the way, in forty years, I have seen two cases of EFB, confirmed by Beltsville. One was back in the 1970s, and I recognized it right away. The other was last fall and it...
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    Re: What is going on with this?

    Looks like PMS to me. We need to know the mite levels. Have you sampled for mites? What are the mite levels? EFB is rare, I have seen many cases of PMS this weekend looking through other folks'...
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    Re: Dark comb and no eggs

    I was out looking at folk's hives today and saw several with the classic PMS symptoms. A lot of dead larvae, pupae and deformed adults. The dead brood is not brown and gooey, but usually gray colored...
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    Re: Dark comb and no eggs

    I looked at the blurry photos and even from these poor photos it is obvious you have a sick hive. There are dead larvae and bees with deformed wings. It looks like a hive in the late stages of PMS...
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    Re: Treatment free and good sense.

    Hi all

    Back in 2007 I wrote an article on Keeping Bees without Chemicals. I started off by saying, if I thought it would work I would do it. I had never seen it work in the bees I was in charge of...
  8. Re: Beekeeping Independent Research Studies

    I would look at Apidologie and the Journal of Apicultural Research, for starters.
  9. Re: Beekeeping Independent Research Studies

    Hi
    I am sure a lot of beekeepers are doing "experiments". The crucial thing is to set them up properly so the information is meaningful. Two years ago I tried to control mite buildup during the...
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    Re: Open Feeding (Open Feeders) methods

    I know about all the different types of feeders. What I was trying to find out is if anyone has compared open barrel feeding to hive top feeding as to how it gets distributed in the hives. Obviously,...
  11. Re: Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees

    Routes of acquisition of the gut microbiota of Apis mellifera
    J. Elijah Powell, et al

    ABSTRACT

    Studies of newly emerged Apis mellifera worker bees have demonstrated that their guts are...
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    Re: Mark's new Honey Label

    > Unfortunately folks in my area have questioned this by saying "is it safe to eat" when they read out loud "raw honey".

    Weird. Do they worry about eating raw apples, carrots, etc.?
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    Re: Open Feeding (Open Feeders) methods

    Hi Ian

    I don't know if you get the American Bee Journal, but I just contributed an article on the Bee Lab at Guelph. Paul Kelly described open barrel feeding to me. I have seen it before but...
  14. Re: Our understanding of genetics is changing

    You don't know what you are talking about. You are living in a fairy tale.
  15. Re: Our understanding of genetics is changing

    Not even half.
  16. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees

    Several new papers have come out extolling the many virtues of Lactic acid bacteria in bee guts and honey



    Actually, Martha Gilliam did ground breaking work on this topic and wrote in 1979 that...
  17. Re: Our understanding of genetics is changing

    A lot of people worry over the possibility of GMO bees. Actually, a more realistic approach would be to use RNA to control pest, rather than genetically modify the bees. RNA can scramble internal...
  18. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    Re: bioengineering
  19. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    Actually, TM resistant AFB is not that prevalent. When I was inspecting I found it very occasionally and most of the cases could be traced back to one beekeeper who sold equipment to the others. TM...
  20. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    I have seen them several years old, and still contain combs. Also, I detected AFB in one abandoned hive from the residue on the plastic foundation. (confirmed by Beltsville). Presumably such hives or...
  21. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    AFB dries down to a hard scale which is detectable for years in old comb, both visually and by odor. A small square of this old comb can be sent to Beltsville and they can culture AFB from it,...
  22. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    This is a fair statement, so far as it goes. The main difference is that a hive that dies from varroa takes the varroa with it, whereas a hive that dies of AFB has spores that are viable for 35 years...
  23. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    Here is a method to test for AFB that catches subclinical cases (without visible symptoms)
  24. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    Did you read the paper? Nothing in supports your statement. They say



    They suggest probiotics might be added as an enhancement to the methods already used:



    The trouble with the whole...
  25. Re: Newbees, Mediums and AFB -- a cautionary tale

    This is incorrect. The spores are passed to the larvae and they germinate there. They don't germinate under other conditions (except in culture dishes).
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