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  1. Replies
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    Re: Sumac - Staghorn sumac and others

    Apparently cold stratification for 30+ days produces a 45% germination rate. Treatment with gibberellic acid, then cold stratification, boosts the rate to 60%.
  2. Re: Project BudBurst - a mapping resource for beekeepers?

    And I did NOT know that from what I was reading of Walt Wright's work. I never really got to try it out, so no direct experience of the mis-match in my part of the country. Thanks!

    Anyway, that's...
  3. Project BudBurst - a mapping resource for beekeepers?

    Beesource has a "Post Your Bloom Dates" forum. I wonder if anyone wants to help map where and when different bee-friendly species go into bloom?

    Looking for information on when certain trees...
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    Re: Looking for mid to late summer pollen plants

    I got interested in this topic and discovered that bloom time for sumacs sort of jump around. Plus there's a lot of variance in when people say they bloom. I have a fourth one on my list, Shining...
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    Re: Apps or Ideas for recording bloom cycles

    Phenology is the study of when botanical things happen in the yearly cycle. One "happening" that's fairly easy to pin down is 'Leaf Out.'

    This page (https://www.usanpn.org/data/spring) on the...
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    Re: Looking for mid to late summer pollen plants

    Peter Lindtner, in his book Garden Plants for Honey Bees likes sunflowers for pollen in July-August. (Wicwas 2014.) Also borage.

    Mignonette (Reseda odorata), originally from Egypt via Napoleon...
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    Re: Its not really nectar, is it?

    The bees seem to be taking in nectar here in Philadelphia, and storing it. 2-3 frames per colony are half-filled, and bars in my TBH.
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    Sumac - Staghorn sumac and others

    I'm getting Saghorn sumac for my backyard, and wondering about the nectar it produces. Sumacs are dioecious — the flowers on an individual tree are either all-male, or all-female.

    Peter Lindtner,...
  9. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    Thanks! warrior. That's the sort of info I've been looking for.

    For whatever reason, the City of Philadelphia plants lots of maples and sycamores along the streets. They do heave the pavements...
  10. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    Thanks for the comments, Michael. I already went ahead and wrote up what I could, a few weeks ago, based on what I could discover.

    Here's what I put in the handout:


    ♦ Honey Locust (Gleditsia...
  11. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    I've finished the list. It's pretty comprehensive, aiming at what's best for our region. We presented it at the club's symposium earlier this month, and had a nice panel discussion with some of the...
  12. Re: Yellowwood, Kentucky yellow-wood, Gopherwood, Virgilia?

    That's from one source, though more reliable than some, and I'm wondering if anyone here has direct experience with Yellowwood.



    Yes, and privately we can plant that tree in our yards and...
  13. Yellowwood, Kentucky yellow-wood, Gopherwood, Virgilia?

    Yellowwood was chosen as the 2015 'Urban Tree of the Year' by the Society of Municipal Arborists, and a local tree guy has suggested it could be a bee-friendly tree. Apparently it's not very common,...
  14. Thread: Hackberry?

    by Kofu
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    Hackberry?

    I'm drawing up a list of bee-friendly trees and shrubs for our area — S.E. Pennsylvania, southern N.J., Delaware and the region.

    One tree I thought I had 'discovered' which is pollinator-friendly...
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    Sticky: Re: Extractor-less honey by Flow Hive

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfVs0TVmYDI

    Actually, Andrzej Tenus is in Poland, and he had his Polish viewers in mind when he made the video, as he explains in the comments on the Youtube page....
  16. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    The best way to understand our project is to put it alongside efforts everywhere in the country to improve the forage for honey bees. At our last bee club meeting we saw an online powerpoint/audio...
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    Re: Wind pollination...

    Okay... As it turns out, the book was published in 1918! That's okay. I ordered it. Wicwas Press is a good group of people and they deserve our business. This book might even be the best information...
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    Re: Wind pollination...

    Oh, the city environment's not so bad. There are stresses, of course. For trees planted between the sidewalk and the street definitely there are limitations. I think the main limit is on softwood...
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    Re: Wind pollination...

    Part of my understanding comes from realizing that honeybees are opportunistic foragers, moochers who take advantage of pre-existing relationships between certain plant species and certain insect...
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    Re: Wind pollination...

    In a practical sense my question is, why wasn't I able to find this sort of information before, when I searched Beesource for it? And why didn't I stumble upon it sooner when I searched the web and...
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    Re: Wind pollination...

    I'm feeling my way along, here. I have mostly questions and I appreciate your help in clarifying them. Thanks for the example of stag-horn sumac. Do the male flowers produce pollen and the female...
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    Sticky: Re: Extractor-less honey by Flow Hive

    Maybe the word should be 'native' (to Australia), and the flow hive is an introduced species elsewhere? (Not calling it an "invasive," of course. :lookout: )
  23. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    You mean the tulip poplars, right? I looked for information about poplars and found they're in the Populus family (including cottonwoods, aspens, etc.) which are mainly wind-pollinated. Tulip poplars...
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    Wind pollination...

    I'm compiling a complete list of bee-friendly trees for our area, and I started to wonder about the other trees... What about the oaks, the birches, the hornbeams and the hophornbeams, etc.?
    ...
  25. Re: Trees for bees, Mid-Atlantic region, especially street trees

    That's an excellent point, something to keep in mind. I've started a facebook group on the topic, for anyone with an interest in this topic.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/191211807880030/
    ...
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