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NeilV
02-02-2014, 08:20 AM
In the past, I posted about buying a table saw to make my own boxes (and cut off my fingers). I still haven't bought a table saw (I sorta like my fingers), and now I've got a different idea.

The man I bought my house from sold me all of his woodworking tools as part of the deal. I already have a really nice radial arm saw and band saw. I also have a ok router table that he made by mounting a plunge-type router inside of a cabinet/table. I don't want to make a huge number of hives. I just want to make my own woodenware for hives and nucs. It would be hard to recover the investment on a table saw, although it would be cool to have one.

Instead of buying a table saw, could I use the radial arm saw to cross-cut the boards, get a fence for the band saw to rip the boards, use the router table to cut frame rests and rabbet joints, and then use a skill saw to make hand holds? (I've seen a jig set-up for making hand holds with a skill saw.)

I have all of that stuff except a fence for the band saw. Does such a fence exist, and would there be some standard fence attachment that would fit a standard but old Craftsman band saw?

Also, what size router bits would I need to make rabbet joints and/or frame rests?

Would it be better to bite the bullet and just get a table saw?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Deepsouth
02-02-2014, 08:39 AM
I would say buy a table saw. It will make it so much more enjoyable. You could get them relatively cheap at home depot since you wont be making many hives. But me personally, I would invest in a better quality one. They are worth it in my opinion.

Daniel Y
02-02-2014, 08:46 AM
simple answer yes. Long answer is that you will find a wide variety of quality of the work due to the tool chosen. Will a router cut a mortise? yes. will it do it well? actually the quality of the cut will be good with practice. but it is not the most efficient method. get a carbide bit. HHS are worthless.

My biggest concern would be the ripping on a band saw. yes it can be done. but the saw needs to be very well tuned and the blade needs to be in excellent condition. otherwise the saw does not make a straight cut making a fence useless. On this one count I woudl encourage you to shop around and find a low priced used table saw on craig's list or at a garage sale to make rip cuts with. as for cross cuts with a radial arm saw. well that is the primary purpose of a radial arm saw. sort of what was in mind for it to do as it was being thought up. You can do much more with it if you want. just like you can make rip cuts with a band saw. but is it not what it was made to do. In fact you can make your rip cuts with the radial arm saw. and I would probably advice you learn how to do that over messing with the band saw.

With some homework and figuring out just how to get each cut made. you have all the tools you need to make hives. Just don't take on any offers at a race by someone with a shop like I have.

Part of that speed thing is experience though. I had 100 boards cut to length that needed to be ripped into top bars for frames yesterday. to gt it done i sent 4 different people out to cut 25 each. I was the last one to go. My pourpose was to have an opportunity to work with each one and their skill at using the table saw.

Person one My oldest daughter. she is new to using the saw and i felt it best to just show her once or twice and then leave her to find her own comfort level. time to rip 25 boards. just over an hour. Next up is my Youngest daughter fiancee. Also new to the saw but a bit timid so I specifically encouraged him to pick up his speed. His technique is good. He ran right at 45 minutes for 25 boards.

My son who is the next best at the table saw next to me went out half board, half distracted and ran through 25 boards in 35 minutes. He lost quite a bit of time due to not staying on task.

My turn and now everyone is standing there with a stop watch. literally. 19 minutes 45 seconds to rip 25 boards to 1 and 1/16th inch wide pieces. That is a total of 200 at an average time of less than 6 seconds per cut. and i had several boards that gave me some serious trouble and tripped the breaker on the saw 3 or 4 times. Lousy quality wood is what that is called. And running a saw on a 15 amp circuit does not help. Btu my real average cut time was probably closer to 4 seconds per cut. Closer to 7 for my son and nearly 30 seconds for my daughter.

In all there is a lot that has to do with the operator rather than the machine. Keep that in mind.

NeilV
02-02-2014, 08:56 AM
I use the radial saw for cross cuts, and I'd do that even if I had a table saw. But wouldn't it be crazy dangers to rip boards with that thing?

Mike Gillmore
02-02-2014, 09:00 AM
Buy a decent used table saw, you'll be glad you did. With a table saw included in your arsenal you will be able to easily make any hive parts you like.

I bought an old Atlas belt driven table saw for just over $100 and it's made a lot of hive woodenware. Paid for itself very quickly.

Rader Sidetrack
02-02-2014, 09:08 AM
I recommend buying a decent but inexpensive tablesaw from someone on your local Craigslist.

You can also buy a commercial fence for your bandsaw, but a fence for a bandsaw is not hard to make from wood. Here's one example:
http://www.ibuildit.ca/Workshop%20Projects/band-saw-fence-2.html

treetrunk
02-02-2014, 09:13 AM
As a hobby woodworker I agree with what Mr. Y stated. Look for a used table saw. Rockwell 10's for example can be found for $250 often on CL bonus if it comes with a Dado set. Quick tuneup and you will have a very nice saw that will last a lifetime. If you do not plan to do much woodworking out side of making boxes I would recommend selling the bandsaw to recoup $ for the Table saw.

Rader Sidetrack
02-02-2014, 09:15 AM
Here is a $70 Rockwell 10" tablesaw in the Tulsa area:

http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/4314715927.html
Looks like a bargain.


A $40 one:
http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/4287107005.html

Obviously, examine in person before making a decision.

shinbone
02-02-2014, 09:20 AM
Yeas ago, I made all my wooden wear on a table saw. Sucked up a hug amount of time, but I had no money so I had no choice.

I am hobbyist with a dozen hives and little free time, so I now buy my wooden wear.

I guess whether and how you build your hives depends on many factors such as what you like to do with your free time, how many hives you need, etc.

BTW, having a race on using a table saw sounds like an invitation to disaster, to me. Especially with inexperienced users.

jus say'n

cdevier
02-02-2014, 09:24 AM
All good advice - spend your money on a table saw. I probably use my radial arm saw more than any other saw , but I do not rip boards with it.
Charlie

Daniel Y
02-02-2014, 09:36 AM
So who has invited anyone to a race?

treetrunk
02-02-2014, 09:41 AM
Good deal on both of these, although they are a light duty version of the Rockwell 10 probably made over sea's. As long as they can spin a dado set they should work fine.




Here is a $70 Rockwell 10" tablesaw in the Tulsa area:

http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/4314715927.html
Looks like a bargain.


A $40 one:
http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/4287107005.html

Obviously, examine in person before making a decision.

Colino
02-02-2014, 09:45 AM
A $40 one:
http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/4287107005.html

Obviously, examine in person before making a decision.

Neil: Run don't walk to look at this saw I have one almost identical and it is more than you'll need. $40 what a steal!
Colino

Rader Sidetrack
02-02-2014, 09:47 AM
Seem like mention of a stopwatch and noting production throughput of woodworking newbees amounts to a virtual race. :rolleyes: Take the clock off the wall ... watch their fingers instead.

Barry
02-02-2014, 09:49 AM
I use the radial saw for cross cuts, and I'd do that even if I had a table saw. But wouldn't it be crazy dangers to rip boards with that thing?

Not crazy dangerous, just not very fast and requires a lot more space to use this way. I often use my radial arm saw for truing up a board edge with table extensions on both sides that are 12' long. Get a table saw, and preferably one that is belt driven that allows a stacked dado blade use.

NeilV
02-02-2014, 09:56 AM
Barry, sorry for the wrong forum. Didn't mean to make work for you.

I am tring to look into the yellow saw pictured. That is actually within bee range of my house, at least during a dearth.

How do I tell if a saw has enough power/space to run a Dado?

As to racing, won't be happening!!!

Rader Sidetrack
02-02-2014, 10:08 AM
Measure the remaining arbor beyond the end of the nut when a regular 1/8" blade is already mounted. If you have at least 5/8" of unused thread then you have enough arbor for a 3/4" stack dado.

Power is not as clearcut, but as long as the saw motor can bring the dado up to speed, it will cut. How fast you can feed the wood will be dependent on the HP available.

I would look to see that the saw has adequate arbor, and has an induction motor. If it doesn't vibrate excessively when running, for $40-$70 you can hardly go wrong IMO.

Note that you don't necessarily have to use a full 3/4" of the stack dado set. You can make box joints with fingers smaller than 3/4" if you choose.

Barry
02-02-2014, 10:10 AM
That saw looks like it has a direct drive motor. I don't know of any direct drive saws that accept a stack dado. The base looks plastic, so I think it's a portable saw that has been put on a stand. Call and find out.

psfred
02-02-2014, 10:39 AM
Ripping boards on a radial arm saw is a very poor idea, almost as bad as cutting toward yourself with one (I see too much of that).

Look for a table saw with a cast iron table and belt drive. Any age, any make. Old ones that look nasty can be just fine with some elbow grease to shine up the table, and I would assume that any saw, including new ones, needs to be checked and adjusted for proper alignment of blade and table.

A radial arm saw is just the ticket for cutting boards to length. Beats messing around with a table saw every time.

Cutting box joints on a table saw isn't difficult, just a bit time consuming and fiddly to set up. Once you have a working jig, you can cut many, many boards fairly quickly. Make sure you have a fence high enough to keep your fingers clear of the blade!

I do use a band saw for producing end bars and top bars, at least for some cuts. It's fiddly, you need a good blade (don't buy cheap ones!) and there is some learning curve, but the extra parts make up for it.

I'll be out in the garage this afternoon making top bars and end bars myself - finally got the power fixed so it's much less hassle than it used to be. I'm making about 300 frames this year, I think....

Peter

mathesonequip
02-02-2014, 10:47 AM
entry level 10 inch table saws are light on power for a dado blade, unless you like to go real slow and still wait for the reset button to cool off.

burns375
02-02-2014, 10:52 AM
You can get by with long metal straight edge, clamps and circular saw.

Barry
02-02-2014, 12:02 PM
Ripping boards on a radial arm saw is a very poor idea, almost as bad as cutting toward yourself with one (I see too much of that).

A good craftsman doesn't blame his tools. :) The fact is, radial arm saws are designed to be able to rip. This is the best way to true a long board. I would never suggest that one use this method for all their ripping needs, but it can be done safely and accurately.

johng
02-02-2014, 12:11 PM
I have made over 100 boxes in the past few weeks with just a radial arm saw and a router table. Why would you rip with a band saw when you have the radial arm? The radial arm saw will cross cut and rip without any problems. You can use rabbited boxes to keep things simple. The radial arm cuts the end rabbits very easily but, I did not like cutting the frame rest rabbit with the radial arm saw so that's what I use the router table for it cuts the frame rest very easily and safely. I would eventually like to get a table saw but, I can make decent boxes without one. My dad gave me the radial arm saw so I am just using what I already have. Kind of like you are trying to do.

marant
02-02-2014, 12:50 PM
You can often get decent tools, including table saws, at your local pawnshop. Just be sure it works properly or you can return it.

honeyman46408
02-02-2014, 02:45 PM
The fact is, radial arm saws are designed to be able to rip. This is the best way to true a long board. I would never suggest that one use this method for all their ripping needs, but it can be done safely and accurately. Safety is the word I have heard horror stories about some one feeding the wrong direction and throwing a board through the side of his shop

rwurster
02-02-2014, 03:49 PM
My radial arm can rip all day long when the head is rotated 90 degrees. I use it for cross cutting and the table saw for ripping.

My-smokepole
02-02-2014, 06:20 PM
I hate ripping on a radial saw. Fine for cutting to length. Sent to many boards flying on my radials. Never got comfortable with it. I am to the point I can't live without my table saw own two and thinking about a third. One
David

capt44
02-02-2014, 06:33 PM
I've built and sold a lot of beehives.
I have a Porter Cable 10" table saw Model PCB270TS.
I use to cut my rabbet joints and frame rest with a router but I was using too small a router and the bits kept breaking at the shank.
Let me tell you that's a scary situation when a router bit comes apart.
About the only thing I use my router table for now is cutting grooves to inset boards for an inner cover.
A table saw will rip you boards, square the ends if needed, do all your dado cutting a lot easier.
I use a radial saw to crosscut my boards or to cut angles for things like landing ramps on bottom boards.
A table saw would be a good investment.
Whether it's a high dollar saw or a low budget saw always check your fence for being square with the blade.
The saw table has tracks which do not move, when you set your fence measure the fence on each end from the fence to the edge of the track, the measurements should always be the same on each end, if not adjust the fence or the cut will not be square.
Even with radial saws, when an angle is changed and brought back to 90 degrees it's a good idea to use a framing square and check to see of the blade is square with the fence.
Saws do get a little play with age.
I have the Porter Cable Table Saw and an Old Craftsman Table Saw.

NeilV
02-03-2014, 06:01 PM
Well, one of the two suggested saws on Craigslist was gone, and the person selling the other one won't reply to my emails.

There is a another nice looking contractor's (portable) saw that looks good. I'm thinking the contractor's saw would be better because of a lack of room in the small shop I have. The only drawback to the new option is that it will only accept a 1/2" Dado blade. Should I look into that saw, or should I wait for one that will take a 3/4" dado.

Stung-a-lot
02-03-2014, 06:25 PM
I recently bought a DeWalt portable contractor table saw and the arbor was too short to use with my dato blade. I found that I could remove the backer shim and replace it with a heavy duty 5/8" flat washer and it has worked well for me. I use a Craftsman wobble type dato for building my equipment.

Cleo C. Hogan Jr
02-03-2014, 07:12 PM
NeilV.... Unless you plan to sell a lot of boxes, or want to replicate commercially made boxes, there is nothing wrong with making your box joints 1/2 inch rather than 3/4 inch. Will take just a littler longer to make the extra cuts. No big deal unless you plan to make lots of boxes.

cchoganjr

NeilV
02-03-2014, 08:12 PM
Could I make some sort of a rabbet joint with a 1/2" Dado, or would I really need a 3/4"?

Also, what about cutting the frame rests?

Cleo C. Hogan Jr
02-03-2014, 08:25 PM
NeilV.... Any standard blade will cut rabbet joints, and if I were making rabbet joints I would use a good insert blade. In fact, I did that for years. If you use the dado, most people would use the 3/4 dado, and only rabbet cut the front and rear pieces.

For the frame rests use any standard blade if you don't have a dado larger than 1/2. 1/2 is not deep enough for deeps or shallow frame rests.

cchoganjr

Rader Sidetrack
02-03-2014, 08:26 PM
Yes, you can make rabbet joints with less than a 3/4" dado. Here is one example ...

http://www.rockler.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Double-Rabbet-Joint.jpg
The photo is linked from this page on rabbet joints: http://www.rockler.com/how-to/basic-rabbet-joints/

If each dado cut is the same, and the wood is 3/4" thick, then each dado is 3/8" .

Cleo C. Hogan Jr
02-03-2014, 08:30 PM
Radar is 100% correct. You can do it by making 2 cuts, one 3/8 cut on the front and rear boards, and another 3/8 cut on the side pieces.

I should have said that in my post above. I did not change to box joints until about 2003, and I used a 3/4 dado and only cut the front and rear boards.

cchoganjr

deknow
02-03-2014, 08:47 PM
I use the radial saw for cross cuts, and I'd do that even if I had a table saw. But wouldn't it be crazy dangers to rip boards with that thing?

If everything is adjusted perfectly and you are really careful it can be safe...but it is not recommend at all...there are too many things that need to be perfectly adjusted, the blade (and motor) are hanging off a long fulcrum that will have all kinds of stress if things go south, making them go really, really far south fast.

It is worth noting that there are tons of craftsman RAS's out there for sale for cheap that are not very good (probably ok to setup to do 90 degree crosscuts only)....they are not in the same league as the dewalts, delta/rockwell (especially the turret models), or a sawsmith (variable speed baby!)...I'm sure there are others, but look for cast iron and impossible to lift.

I have a nice rockwell (turret) that i have ripped on...once. It was enough motivation to go buy a table saw.

RAS's are wonderful tools...they largely fell out of favor because of the post war diy boom...cheaper saws were being made that were not safe unless they were perfectly aligned (and the forces on these things means that they may need frequent tweaking), and therefore the books being written to do these diy projects stopped including them.

Get thee a table saw (even a cheap 8" craftsman direct drive), and make sure you adjust it even if it is new.

deknow

Mike Gillmore
02-04-2014, 05:20 AM
I use a table saw with a regular blade to cut Rabbets, no Dado needed. I'll cut out the notches slightly less than needed, and then run the pieces across my table router to clean up the cut and square it up nicely. It's a little extra work, but I don't mind because I'm not mass producing boxes.

What I do is a variation of the videos below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJfpDhNi2Gs&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dyyq4g51iXg

Yvesrow1
02-04-2014, 05:14 PM
Here's what I'd like to get my hands on for building boxes...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9Sti5hf0Uc

snl
02-04-2014, 05:21 PM
Here's what I'd like to get my hands on for building boxes...

They are for sale are they not?

deknow
02-04-2014, 05:23 PM
Sure they are designed to be able to rip...but the exposed blade and mechanical torsion inherent on an RAS make it a poor choice next to the cheapest table saw.

deknow


A good craftsman doesn't blame his tools. :) The fact is, radial arm saws are designed to be able to rip. This is the best way to true a long board. I would never suggest that one use this method for all their ripping needs, but it can be done safely and accurately.

NeilV
02-04-2014, 06:06 PM
My RAS is a monstrosity that is, to my novice eyes, a well-made, powerful saw. I actually use it more than I ever would have expected, even though I'm also scared of it. A person could cut a hand off in the blink of an eye with that thing. I will assure everybody that I am never using my RAS for ripping boards. It may be doable for somebody who know how, but its way to scary for me.

I'm going to break down and find a decent table saw. I think I'll just be patient and watch craigslist until I find something that is small but that will be powerful enough to do everything I will need. Even though it is not really useful for beekeeping, I think I'd like something that can is big enough to cut a sheet of plywood down the middle.

When I moved into this house 4 years ago, I lacked any power tool experience. Just never had the stuff around when I was growing up. My grandfather was a carpenter, but he died when I was six. What I've learned is that having good tools leads to using them to do fun stuff. I built a chicken coop when I moved in here with my father-in-law's help, and I learned a bunch from that.

I also really appreciate all the information and help. (I'm not trying to kill this thread either. All ideas continue to be welcomed.)

Rader Sidetrack
02-04-2014, 06:37 PM
Cutting a full 4'x8' sheet on a tablesaw is a not much fun, regardless of the size of the saw table. If you are working by yourself you will likely need a couple of auxiliary supports at a minimum. I find that clamping a cutting guide (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00002N5OF/aconco-20) to the sheet and using a handheld saw works much better for me.


A useful free tool to alert you of new Craigslist listings meeting your search criteria is IFTTT.com (https://ifttt.com/).

NeilV
02-04-2014, 06:52 PM
That's how I cut the sheets when I did the chicken coop. Maybe I don't need to be able to to that with a table saw.

rwurster
02-04-2014, 10:28 PM
Cutting a full 4'x8' sheet on a tablesaw is a not much fun, regardless of the size of the saw table.

That's no kidding. I use a circular saw to get it to a more manageable size. Even with an out feed table its tricky.

cristianNiculae
02-04-2014, 11:13 PM
I finally made my table saw and I'm very satisfied with it. Some of the ideas came from here:
http://www.ibuildit.ca/table-saw-1.html
This guy is a genius.

The result:
90519052

The fence works like a charm; the slade also is not bad. In time I want to replace the actual table with a metal sheet if I find a cheap one.

Price: $ 100

The phtos are a bit old. Currently I have a switch and an outlet attached to the table, and a meter. I've made 15 deep boxes using the hand saw, I should have started with the table instead :).

Regards,
Cristian

Barry
02-05-2014, 05:09 AM
I think I'd like something that can is big enough to cut a sheet of plywood down the middle.

I've cut many a sheets of plywood on my portable tablesaw.

http://www.blackanddecker.com//ProductImages/PC_Graphics/PHOTOS/DEWALT/TOOLS/LARGE/7/DW744XRS_A8.jpg

It's not hard to do if you're familiar with working a table saw. Unlike this guy, I use one roller stand to support the piece between the blade and fence.

http://www.hammerzone.com/gift/photos/ptgixy08a_tools_ideas.jpg

Barry
02-05-2014, 05:40 AM
Sure they are designed to be able to rip...but the exposed blade and mechanical torsion inherent on an RAS make it a poor choice next to the cheapest table saw.

Dean, how do you true up a 10' board on your table saw?

Daniel Y
02-05-2014, 05:44 AM
That photo proves nothing. construction workers are animals :)

cg3
02-05-2014, 05:58 AM
I've cut many a sheets of plywood on my portable tablesaw.


Ditto. We'll usually rig some sort of infeed and outfeed tables from sawhorses or scrap.

deknow
02-05-2014, 07:01 AM
Dean, how do you true up a 10' board on your table saw?
I've become addicted to using the jointer on my shopsmith as prep for the table saw.

I run 1 edge through the jointer until I end up with a very good edge (in most cases just one or two passes), then, on the table saw, I run the jointed edge along the fence (I have a good, solid, aftermarket Vega fence that is dead parallel to the blade) either 'kissing' the blade to just true it up, or ripping it to a measured width. Without a jointer, I would do it all on the table saw, alternating edges against the fence/blade until they are parallel.

NeilV, do read up on adjusting the RAS you have, the alignment is key to safety, accuracy, and understanding where the dangers lie in using the thing.

Cristian...I was going to send you to Craigslist to find a used saw, but then noticed your location. :) One of the key things for a good tablesaw is sheer mass...you want a saw that isn't going to vibrate much, and isn't going to walk across the floor. It looks like you did a very good job with your saw and it will help you make anything. Around here there are older cast iron saws (esp. craftman branded) available for $100 every day, and with a bit of work these can be top notch saws, and the cast iron table does a lot for the stability of everything. This kind of thing may be harder to come by in Romania, but keep your eyes out...if you could build that saw, you could rebuild almost anything and have a great, lifetime saw.

On second look, you might consider adding some diagonal braces to the legs to keep it from twisting under load...but if it feels really solid there is probably no need.

deknow

deknow
02-05-2014, 07:11 AM
When I bought my aftermarket fence, I got a huge one, also thinking about full sheets of plywood. Like others, I think that a table saw isn't the best way to do this now that I have done it :)

If you let go of needing 4' between the blade and the fence to handle a full sheet, you will find many more good options for a saw, it will be smaller (and more manageable). I would love to buy or build a sheet saw like they have at HD...currently I tend to use a circular saw and a straight edge for such things...I recently got a beefy guide for the circular saw for such things, but I haven't set it up and used it yet.

deknow

Daniel Y
02-05-2014, 07:44 AM
There are many ways to do just about anything in a shop./ finding those that are doable with yoru equipment and increase accuracy is a whole lot of what woodworking is about. it is the challenge. the puzzle that needs to be solved.

Barry
02-05-2014, 12:08 PM
I've become addicted to using the jointer on my shopsmith as prep for the table saw.

I run 1 edge through the jointer until I end up with a very good edge (in most cases just one or two passes), then, on the table saw, I run the jointed edge along the fence (I have a good, solid, aftermarket Vega fence that is dead parallel to the blade) either 'kissing' the blade to just true it up, or ripping it to a measured width. Without a jointer, I would do it all on the table saw, alternating edges against the fence/blade until they are parallel.


deknow

Dean, what you described is not what I'm after. You're truing up the edge but not the length of the board. You'll make a nice finished edge, even parallel, but this won't take the bow out of a long board since your jointer table and table saw fence are only engaging a few feet of the board at a time. You need something (I've used my RAS) where the two ends of the board are riding on a straight edge or fence the whole time of the cut. I've bought a truck load of rough sawn oak in the past for furniture and you have to get a perfectly straight edge on one side the whole length of the board before you can do much else with it.

treetrunk
02-05-2014, 12:18 PM
That photo proves nothing. construction workers are animals :)

Well it proves that Barry is a handsome fellow.... Whoops just read it over again, thats not Barry sorry....


Buy the $40 table saw on CL and be done with it.

cg3
02-05-2014, 02:01 PM
Dean, what you described is not what I'm after. You're truing up the edge but not the length of the board. You'll make a nice finished edge but this won't take the bow out of it.

I screw a metal stud to the curved board to run against the fence. Makes a good circular saw guide, too.

NeilV
02-05-2014, 06:19 PM
Yeah, but if I actually needed a board cut, I'd take Barry over the model dude.

Dean, I will follow your advice. I have the manual. But I still think that, in my case, the real danger is the loose screw that operates the thing.

Barry, I actually have one of those roller things in my shop, and I did not know what it was for. (No kidding)

Michael Palmer
02-05-2014, 07:18 PM
Dean, how do you true up a 10' board on your table saw?

Well, 10' is kind of long to do this...but for shorter boards...

Lay a straight 2x4x3' or so against the fence. I've seen a metal 2x4 used too. Place the concave side of the bowed board against the 2x4. Adjust fence to make cut at convex side. When you make the cut, slide the 2x4 along the fence leaving the board stationary against the 2x4. Cuts off the bowed edge leaving it straight.

BEE STALKER
02-05-2014, 07:34 PM
On the jobsite we need to true up long boards for concrete screeds, we snap a chalk line on the board and cut with the skilsaw.

For more accuracy flip it over and finish it on the table saw. Cut the concave side with the skilsaw first so you end up with one piece cut-off on the table saw. If your first cut isn't perfect, you can flip it one more time and trim it true on the T saw.

Barry
02-05-2014, 08:48 PM
My radial arm can rip all day long when the head is rotated 90 degrees.

Yes, I believe that is inferred, even though you're the only one that has actually stated rotating 90 degrees. I would never rip a board the normal crosscut way by pulling the saw toward the user.

Barry
02-05-2014, 08:54 PM
Could I make some sort of a rabbet joint with a 1/2" Dado, or would I really need a 3/4"?

Also, what about cutting the frame rests?

You can make all the cuts required for box building with just a single blade except box joints. Even that you could do, but it would take forever. Just make rabbet joints on your boxes. I've made a bunch with rabbets and they hold up great.

NewJoe
02-06-2014, 06:24 AM
You can make all the cuts required for box building with just a single blade except box joints. Even that you could do, but it would take forever. Just make rabbet joints on your boxes. I've made a bunch with rabbets and they hold up great.

The saw that I use the most will not accept 3/4" dado blades. So , I do mine just as Barry describes and it works perfectly....It only takes about three changes in the blade setting when making boxes with 3/8 x 3/4 rabbets for the corner joints, and 3/8 x 5/8 rabbets for the frames rest.

NeilV
02-15-2014, 10:23 AM
Update: This morning, I bought a lightly used Delta TS-300 for $130 off of Craigslist. Had everything but the blade guard and the manual, which I think will locate. It will run 6" dado blade that is a little bigger than 3/4," so that will be covered too. Thanks for the help, everybody. Now I can become a used lumber scrapper.