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rand
12-03-2010, 01:17 PM
- just information to people who think about beekeeping in the desert

After execly a year experience with raising bees in the desert
being a pioneer in my location, i came to a clear conclusion that
the tough area conditions makes desert beekeeping on the edge of profit in a good year or not profitable at all:

Very high tepratures
Less then 90 mm rain/year
Short blooming period
Not enough fauna
High maintenance costs
Very good conditions to Wax moth all over the year


Because i allready adict to beekeeping :o, i am thinking about new strategy
of buying NUCS every year, before spring starts, keep them till the end of spring and sell them as strong families, or combine each hive in the apiary with another hive, when they start to decline in June.

AmericasBeekeeper
12-03-2010, 03:55 PM
You have a good plan. Did you know archaeologists uncovered an apiary from the time of the King Solomon. It is the largest apiary and even rivals some today. So even though history has taken much of the glory and vegetation of that time, it shows that you can raise bees there.
http://archaeologynewsreport.blogspot.com/2009/12/beehives-in-ancient-near-east.html

Countryboy
12-03-2010, 08:21 PM
I recall reading about beekeepers in the southwest American desert. As long as their hives were close to a water source, they could be profitable. The more distance from water, the lower the profitability. Keep this in mind when selecting bee yards.

Have you considered migrating your hives to a different location with better pollen and nectar after your flow is over?

Many farmers buy a calf in the spring, feed it out over the summer and sell it in the fall. They find this works for them. Your idea of buying nucs, and selling full hives later sounds very similar.

rand
12-04-2010, 03:50 AM
You have a good plan. Did you know archaeologists uncovered an apiary from the time of the King Solomon. It is the largest apiary and even rivals some today. So even though history has taken much of the glory and vegetation of that time, it shows that you can raise bees there.
http://archaeologynewsreport.blogspot.com/2009/12/beehives-in-ancient-near-east.html

yes, i was reading about it and planning to visit there.

The interesting thing is that they found from DNA checks, the bees was imported from Turkey and wasn't the original species(Apis mellifera syriaca)
or other species from Egept or Iran, that was used in Israel
wich shows that beekeeping was much more sufisticated then reaserches knew it is.
I hope to visit there soon and share some pictures in this great forum.

Randi

rand
12-04-2010, 04:02 AM
I

Have you considered migrating your hives to a different location with better pollen and nectar after your flow is over?

.

First, thank you for your reply.

Yes i have considered migrating, but in my small scale operation that is a second job to my primary job at the university i don't have anough time to handle it, and because of a big chance that my hives will be stolen (big problem over here :( ), when they are not close to my site, i really don't have a choice rather then stay local.

I also think that my desert honey is better then other types ;)

Randi