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View Full Version : How to Administer Sting?



Quint Randle
04-08-2007, 11:37 AM
So I have experience anecdotal evidence with bee stings. I have plantars faciatis (sp?) in both feet and got stung on my ankles several times last year. I noticed -- by accident -- that I was pain free for several weeks thereafter. And one time I got stung on one side and not the other and the side that got stung was better than the other foot.

Anyway, I also had surgery for bi-lateral epicondilitis 14 years ago, my arms do okay (lowercase) but do have trouble from time to time. I might try it there (althought that is an upper extremity.)

So my question is how do you physically administer the sting(s)? Do you get a bunch of bees in a jar each week and just kind of keep them. And then pull one out with tweesers or with your fingers grab them by the wings and them hold them to the skin? I would like to know the specifics of how to administer the sting?

Quint

Joel
04-08-2007, 11:46 AM
Grab about 5 or 6 good sized workers and pop them in a jar. Once the bees are home and you're ready for the apitherapy place the jar in the freezer for less than 5 minutes to slow the little buggers down a bit and make them easy to grab. Decide where you want to place the stings, rembering the benefit comes from a localized reaction that draws antiflamatories, cortisol and meletonin, place a few stings the region needed. This is done by gently picking up the chilled bees by the thorzax with a pair of tweezers. My wife has to do it because I use for my back surgery, L5 region, and I can't reach. The bees will flex the abdomen and then gently dragging that stinger over the injection site unitl the barb catches. I give about 30 secods to inject after pulling the bees away and then scrape out the stinger with a knife or a credit card. After about 1 minute the pain will subside and the warmth begins, blessed relief!

nursebee
04-09-2007, 05:11 PM
Randle,
If you have plantar fasciitis I'd suggest having some custom insoles made by an orthotics pracitce, these are the people that make artificial limbs.

I have PF, get stung on my ankles a lot keeping bees and it does not help me. PF is a physical ailment with physical explanation well understood by some. The majority of people that I know with PF (at least 5 out of 6) have obtained substantial relief from a custom molded arch support.

Quint Randle
04-09-2007, 10:59 PM
I've been through ALL that for PF and MORE. I've been through like 3 podiatrists, other doctors, insets, insoles, you name it and I've done it.

I've actually had the PF pretty much under control. Do exercises regularly. But I really did notice a difference when I got stung last year on the ankles several times, and sometimes just on one side.

I've recently developed very painful heel spurs, on the very back of the heel. Physical therapy is not doing as much as I had hoped. I was thinking of trying some stings. (In addition to everything else.)

Quint

MichaelW
04-16-2007, 09:46 AM
I saw on a Japanese video somewhere where it LOOKED LIKE they where holding a stinger with tweezers, then briefly pricking the skin with the same stinger all over (likely specific) spots on the persons back.

Does anyone use a similar technique?

Joel says 5, 30 second stings in his back!

5 stings elevates my breathing and heart rate a bit more than my comfort level when working the bees, but I usually keep working.

Albert
04-21-2007, 10:55 PM
Hello everyone!

I've been meaning to look over some acupuncture road maps, as I am willing to bet that it would synergise with the bee sting. In other words a sting to the appropriate accupuncture point may very well be better than accupuncture to that spot, and better than a sting nearby.

Of course for all I know it might kill you. Life's a hand of cards sometimes. Seriously though, I figure it would be more beneficial in that fashion.

Regards,
Albert

MichaelW
04-23-2007, 02:47 PM
I kind of assumed on that Japanese video I mentioned that they where hitting the acupunctures points. But you know what they say about assuming!

Gregory and Susan Fariss
04-25-2007, 10:48 AM
Hello everyone!

I've been meaning to look over some acupuncture road maps, as I am willing to bet that it would synergise with the bee sting. In other words a sting to the appropriate accupuncture point may very well be better than accupuncture to that spot, and better than a sting nearby.

...Seriously though, I figure it would be more beneficial in that fashion.

Regards,
Albert

My experience has been that this is true. When I just had the stings where it hurt it helped some. When an apitherapist/accupuncturist marked on my neck, shoulder, arm and hand where I should be stung, the relief of pain was immediate. She also mentioned that if you are off site by a little you should still benefit because unlike an accupuncture needle, the venom of the bee sting will spread out some.

Susan