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clintonbemrose
12-16-2001, 10:25 PM
the question would have been better writen
what type of frames
wooden
wedge or groved top bar
groved/sloted/ or solid bottom bar
thanks for the other links Barry

Barry
12-16-2001, 10:34 PM
Hi Clinton -

Okay, regarding frame type, any of the ones mentioned will work. If you are going to use the 4.9mm foundation, you will be wiring the frames to support the wax. I use the grooved top bar and solid bottom bar as the 4.9mm foundation that I made stops 1/4" short of the bottom bar. If using Dadant's, you may want to use the grooved bottom bar so you don't have to cut each piece of foundation down as it's sized to fit into it. The wiring will do all the holding of the foundation.

Regards,
Barry

joelz
12-17-2001, 07:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by clintonbemrose:
the question would have been better writen
what type of frames
wooden
wedge or groved top bar
groved/sloted/ or solid bottom bar
thanks for the other links Barry<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

my advice is to use grooved top bar, and use plastic foundation as no wiring is necessary, plastic foundation is reusable forever, joel

Clayton
12-18-2001, 06:09 AM
Joelz,

. If you are going to use the 4.9mm foundation, you will be wiring the frames to support the wax.


and use plastic foundation as no wiring is necessary,

reply:

4.9mm foundation is only available in wax. It is not the same cell sizing as other commercial foundation. It can only be purchased through Dadant. However many mill our own foundation such as myself. for info on its use go to Point of View on this site and read Back to Biological Beekeeping by Ed and Dee Lusby. If you want to get bees off the chem's I'd encourage you to read this.

Clay

joelz
12-18-2001, 05:14 PM
a nice thought clay but until a future breakthrough, you are kidding yourself if you think you can manage bees today in the usa without chemicals, maybe your bees will survive for a year or two or maybe three but its not going to work, joel

[This message has been edited by Admin (edited December 27, 2001).]

Dee A. Lusby
12-20-2001, 08:56 PM
Joel Wrote:

a nice thought clay but until a future breakthrough, you are kidding yourself if you think you can manage bees today in the usa without chemicals, maybe your bees will survive for a year or two or maybe three but its not going to work, joel

Reply:
For Biological Management Concepts that were written and published in 1992 years ago on going back to basics in beekeeping without having to use chemicals, drugs, essential oils and acids, artificial feeds, and yes very much using small cell foundation instead, please see issue XXVII of Apiacta, published by the world beekeeping federation of beekeeping associations (Apimondia by the way) 1992, pages 109-117, article titled:
Suggested Biological Manipulative Treatment for Control of Honeybee Mites.

It is found in such prestigous libraries as Cornell Even..... or you can read same here on beesource.com at the following:
http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/apiacta1992.htm

Then to go further you can read also published in Apiacta how to breed honeybees available also here at:
http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/apiacta1995.htm

Then to go further to read about speeded up genetics, something we are all told is necesary to help breed against parasitic mites, you can also read here:
http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/abjnov1989.htm

Then for those of you who have problems and must use chemicals because the field management for non-chemical usage is too hard for you, please see the following on how to decontaminate your combs.
http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/ then go down to chapter 10 on decontamination of beeswax.

For those of you that wish to take advantage of small cell foundation for natural control of parasitic mites and secondary diseases, then by all means please learn to wire and use good wax foundation of 4.9mm sizing or even smaller and purchase from reputable dealers like Dadant's or else selfcontain and make your own using your own clean wax.

Regards,

Dee A. lusby