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wjw777
06-24-2002, 12:50 AM
have a nuc with a virgin queen which just hatched out, two other queen cells I destroyed. the question is how soon will this queen will go out and mate and after she mates how soon will she began laying?
thanks walt

Glenn West
06-24-2002, 07:09 AM
Queens typically will mate within 8 to 9 days of emergence and no more than 2 weeks. It will then take another 9 days after the queen lays the egg before the cell is capped (which, IMO, is the easiest way to tell if you have a laying queen).

Robert Brenchley
06-25-2002, 04:08 AM
What's your climate like? I won't argue with what Glenn says, doubtless it's correct in his conditions. I find, however, that given our dodgy spring weather, it takes a month or so for new queens to come on lay. Once you see nice patches of sealed worker brood you know the new queen's OK.

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Regards,

Robert Brenchley

RSBrenchley@aol.com
Birmingham UK

Hugevol
06-25-2002, 06:29 AM
I had a queen here in Nashville go for almost three weeks before I could find any sign of brood. She was a virgin queen from a early swarm in late March.

wjw777
06-26-2002, 03:22 PM
Thanks everyone, but a new twist to this story. Opened hive today and found at least 4 queen cells on different cells .would they be making queen cells if there is a queen,even a virgin queen in the hive. Nothing seems to follow a pattern with these insects . they have their own rules and plays only by them. No matter what the book says. Please give your opinion on the queen cells , Thank you
Walt
Weather here in Ohio is very hot near 90 every day for the past 6 days.

Robert Brenchley
06-27-2002, 06:07 AM
I've seen something like this myself; if I make a split and leave it with one cell, then they'll start more if they have young larvae and flying bees. Not all strains do this, and it may not be your situation. It could be that your hive really is queenless. In your situation I think I'd take one frame with a cell on it, along with its bees, and start a small nuc just in case, and then destroy the other cells and see what happens. That would then give them an extra chance of raising a queen successfully, just in case.

------------------
Regards,

Robert Brenchley

RSBrenchley@aol.com
Birmingham UK