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lisbee
02-20-2000, 02:43 PM
We are beginning (aka potential) beekeepers in a rural area in colorado @ 6500ft . My husband kept bees 20 years ago and we realize we need to aquire education about new resources, diseases, etc. We have checked some internet resouces and feel we should begin with bees "native" to our area. Several questions: Waht bees are best for us? Where do we find resouces in our area to purchase a starter set (beebox, frames, queen and bees)? Considering our altitude, what's the best time for us to start? How much $$ should it cost for our startup? Am I doing this right? ( / :

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BeesinCOS
02-21-2000, 12:33 PM
I live in Colorado Springs and have received a lot of information from a friend that is a member of the Colorado Springs Bee Keepers club. He recommended Buckfast bees for my son. Plan on the bees arriving at the end of April to first week of May. The wildflowers (aka weeds) should provide enough pollen until the yellow and white clover blooms.

We plan on two hives with the following:
Reversible bottom board; two brood supers with frames (9 5/8 inch); three honey supers with frames (5 11/16 inch); inner cover; telescoping cover; queen excluder; smoker and bee vail. All of this for one hive is about $220 for one hive and one 3 pound bee package.

The biggest area of concern with used equipment is American or European Foul Brood. This is why I am starting my son with new equipment. It takes one stray bee with spores to begin an infection of the hive. Most sources you read recommend treating your hive in the fall and early spring for this.

Our greatest challenge is finding a place within 10 miles to place his bees.

Hope this helps with your starting your hives. http://beesource.com/ubb/smile.gif

simplebee
02-27-2000, 01:26 AM
Beekeeping in CO @ 6500 ft?

Where in Colorado are you?

Check out Carniolan bees or Buckfast. Either variety overwinters better than most as they survive our winters with a smaller cluster size. My preference is for New World Carniolans, because they are bred for V&T mite resistance and are MUCH cheaper ($6-$10/queen, $23-$30 for 3lbs vs. $14-$16/queen, $40-$50 for 3lb package) - which you can find suppliers by mail @:
- http://IRIS.biosci.ohio-state.edu:80/honeybee/breeding/
-
Note - you may find trouble getting 3lb packages sent to you by mail.

Buckfast bees have a tendency to raise mean tempered second/third generation queens, which I've personally experienced (inbred?). They are excellent bees when first re-queened, as are the NWC's. On the 50+ NWC hives (only) I don't use smoke at any time of the year (for speed) and these bees are completely predictable (temperment & production).

As for bee supplies, there's a beekeeping supply place on the South side of Chatfield *** (303-791-1777-Beekeeper Company) which sells all kinds of bee supplies for beginners. 10+ hive woodware purchases are best found on the ads in the back of Bee Culture magazine.


Matthew Westall
-Earthling Bees, Castle Rock, CO

franktrujillo
11-17-2009, 09:09 AM
i live on westen slope and i have russin/carniloian mix they call them "yugo's".i had itall last year and this fall they died my yugo's passed them on production and was in the early spring.I split them as well the same year.russians forage sooner and cooler days 38 F 33%H.As i observe in my observation hive made from a old double pane window.i live @6000'

alpha6
11-17-2009, 09:48 AM
I am at 8200 ft and find Carnis do well here. You would be better off with nucs then packages. The CSBA beekeepers meeting is the 4-6 of Dec. a great place to meet other beeks in Colorado to make contacts and learn more.

Brandy
11-17-2009, 10:35 AM
Since this first post was 9 years ago, I'm not sure if your still looking for bees or not. If so, check out this local group for northern colorado.

http://www.fortnet.org/NCBA/

alpha6
11-17-2009, 10:56 AM
lol.. I didn't even notice that. I guess since they had a total of one post..they either became experts or never got started. :doh:

SwedeBee1970
11-17-2009, 11:11 AM
Consider what is within 3 miles radius of you for forage. If there doesn't appear to be much, maybe bees are not a good option or your area/altitude.

LSBees
11-17-2009, 05:01 PM
We may be relocating to Eastern Colorado out on 59 between Kit Carson and Sierbert, I am not so sure my bees will like it.