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BEE BOB
01-19-2007, 06:45 AM
Has anyone used tung oil or Waterlox (tung oil with resins) as an exterior coating for their hives?

Thanks.

danno1800
01-19-2007, 12:57 PM
I have used tung oil [among other things] and it works as well as any non-paint solutions for me.

Larkspur
01-19-2007, 02:33 PM
I use boiled linseed - much much cheaper and easier to get. Great on the inside - nothing sticks to it if you apply it heavy. Puts oil back into the pine - wood doesn't crack as much with age.

Jim Fischer
01-19-2007, 05:41 PM
I'd worry about tung oil outgassing if woodenware
was stored in close proximity to wax foundation
and other "food" products.

I put tung oil on furniture I refinished, and the
odor was detectable for months after.

Be advised.

Tulipwood
01-20-2007, 08:20 PM
Yes, my thought too. The smell lingers for a very long time.

Apache
02-23-2008, 06:21 PM
So, Tung oil is a no go to coat the bottom board?

Cheers,

Walliebee
02-24-2008, 08:38 AM
This warning is found on a can of boiled linseed oil:

"Use of this product will expose you to arsenic, beryllium, chromium, cadmium and nickel, which are known to cause cancer; and lead which is known to cause birth defects and other reproductive harm."

These metals are added to aid in the drying process.

No thanks--not in my honey!

Apache
02-24-2008, 08:51 AM
Thank you for your response. Does it say the same for Tung oil?

Thanks in advance for any help given.

Ross
02-24-2008, 09:35 AM
Most "tung oils" are not tung oil at all, just oil-varnish mixtures with very little if any real tung oil. Pure tung oil is a wonderful finish, but expensive.

drobbins
02-24-2008, 10:40 AM
Ross

I have some of this

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html

I bought it to use on a guitar body but was thinking of using it on an o-hive I'm building
I've already used it on a smaller/portable o-hive, the one in question is going to be permanent
would you say it's the real deal??

Dave

Apache
02-24-2008, 11:08 AM
One of my bottom boards are "Pre-treated" and it sure looks like its been pressure treated...I am pretty sure that they use toxic chemicals to treat it but correct me if I am wrong.

Cheers,

Austin~

PS, This what i have left over from treating some Spearguns. http://www.minwax.com/products/specialty/tung-oil-direct.cfm

I think I will hold out for some 100% pure for my bottom boards.

Ravenseye
02-24-2008, 11:35 AM
Ross

I have some of this

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html

I bought it to use on a guitar body but was thinking of using it on an o-hive I'm building
I've already used it on a smaller/portable o-hive, the one in question is going to be permanent
would you say it's the real deal??

Dave

Looks to me like it is. Here's a quote from that page:

Tung oil can be applied pure or with Citrus Solvent (http://www.realmilkpaint.com/citrus.html) added if a non-toxic finish is required. Thinners can accelerate the drying process and greatly improve the penetration by cutting the first coat of oil with Citrus Solvent, mineral spirits or turpentine by 50%. Remember by adding mineral spirits or turpentine, Pure Tung Oil becomes toxic with these substances mixed into it, although the finish produced is not toxic because the driers evaporate.

Here's a link to the FDA page that they refer to:

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?FR=175.300

And on the FDA page, it says:

Resinous and polymeric coatings may be safely used as the food-contact surface of articles intended for use in producing, manufacturing, packing, processing, preparing, treating, packaging, transporting, or holding food, in accordance with the following prescribed conditions

The FDA info specifically mentions:

(i) Drying oils, including the triglycerides or fatty acids derived therefrom:
Beechnut.
Candlenut.
Castor (including dehydrated).
Chinawood (tung).
Coconut.
Corn.
Cottonseed.
Fish (refined).
Hempseed.
Linseed.
Oiticica.
Perilla.
Poppyseed.
Pumpkinseed.
Safflower.
Sesame.
Soybean.
Sunflower.
Tall oil.
Walnut.
The oils may be raw, heat-bodied, or blown. They may be refined by filtration, degumming, acid or alkali washing, bleaching, distillation, partial dehydration, partial polymerization, or solvent extraction, or modified by combination with maleic anhydride.


Sounds to me like the suitability issue is more of durability or even ease of use than it is of contact with honey or wax.

drobbins
02-24-2008, 11:57 AM
yea, I found the FDA page, that made it sound like it's the real deal and somewhere in there I saw it said it was safe to use around food stuffs
It really makes wood look nice, I have no idea how it would hold up to weather

Dave

Apache
02-24-2008, 12:33 PM
yea, I found the FDA page, that made it sound like it's the real deal and somewhere in there I saw it said it was safe to use around food stuffs
It really makes wood look nice, I have no idea how it would hold up to weather

Dave


I would think that it should hold fine. Its a common treatment for Spearguns which are submerged in saltwater for hours at a time.

drobbins
02-24-2008, 12:39 PM
hmm, all the spearguns I've seen were plastic and aluminum
you must have some NICE spearguns:)

Dave

Ross
02-25-2008, 08:06 AM
Yep, pure tung oil is approved for food contact. That is the real deal, $1 and ounce.

MichaelW
02-25-2008, 09:37 AM
Waterlox is not your average big box store tung oil. It is Food Grade when dry. Before it completely drys its very toxic, but Waterlox is recommended for cutting boards and other wooden food container/uses due to being completely non-toxic when dry. It does cost $$ though.

I refinished wood floors in 2 rooms with it and will never use another product on sanded wood floors again. Its worth the $$. For floors, mix with stain to avoid pitfalls of staining wood floors. (its not food grade with stain)

For outdoor use, you would have to seal 2 layers of the original formula with their Marine grade stuff. Its the constant UV rays that break it down, not the moisture, or so it says on their website. I'm not sure if the Marine formula is food grade when dry, but if you've already sealed the wood, it shouldn't penetrate to bad??? It would look great on hives, but probably not be very practical or economical.

It could be very practical however to use the Original formula as a food grade layer on a wooden uncapping tank. Seal the outside in shellac as its cheaper and not staying wet for long periods of time and you'll have one great looking, low cost uncapping tank.

Not trying to be a sales rep, but except for the volatiles when drying, this stuff is great!

http://www.waterlox.com/

FordGuy
02-25-2008, 06:18 PM
if there was a chance in a million that any of you were wrong, I'd prefer to let my bottom boards rot.

I add no chemicals to my hives besides menthol and bee go, just a promise I made to myself and I have kept it. If the bees die, they die. I would never be brave (or brazen) enough to use treated wood, even the new stuff that doesn't contain arsenic. Sorry guys, not judging anyone, just telling you how I think.