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GSM
05-22-2000, 02:52 PM
After about 4 weeks the bottom super of my new hive is is just about full. I have been feeding the bees and they have drawn out all but the outsides of the outer frames. They seem to be producing alot of honey especially on the outer frames (no larvae there), some of which is in the form of capped over cells that nearly connect some of the top bars. I decided that it was time for a top super. My questions are:
Was I too hasty in putting on the top super - and if so, what should my next move be?
Also, the three central frames of the bottom super have become so plastered together that I couldn't break them apart without doing a considerable amount of damage. What now? As always, any advise will be greatly appreciated.

Gary

Pollinator
05-26-2000, 06:24 PM
<<After about 4 weeks the bottom super of my new hive is is just about full. I have been feeding the bees and they have drawn out all but the outsides of the outer frames.>>

If you started with all foundation, remember that they don't draw the outside frames very well. They may not finish them, and eventually they will be unfinishable. So rotate them with some frames that are already drawn, so you can get all of them finished.

<<They seem to be producing alot of honey especially on the outer frames (no larvae there), some of which is in the form of capped over cells that nearly connect some of the top bars. I decided that it was time for a top super. My questions are:
Was I too hasty in putting on the top super - and if so, what should my next move be?>>

Nope, you should add another box whenever the present box is about 2/3 full. So you were not too late. Actually I'd rather be early, but when you have a lot of foundation to draw, perhaps they will do better if you don't get too far ahead of them. Next year, when you have drawn comb, give them LOTS of space, as soon as the first flow starts.


<<Also, the three central frames of the bottom super have become so plastered together that I couldn't break them apart without doing a considerable amount of damage. What now? As always, any advise will be greatly appreciated.>>

Are the frames just glued with propolis or burr comb between them? Usually you can run the sharp edge of the hive tool like a knife and separate them, especially when it's a hot day. If they have built a lot of rogue comb, then you might just as well take the three frames together, out of the brood chamber, and put them into a super of the same depth. When the brood hatches out, you can then separate them, and salvage whatever honey is there. You may have to replace the foundation. Make sure the queen is not in this mess when you bring them above an excluder. It's best to spot her on another frame, rather than tear apart a mess trying to find her. If she's not visible on another frame, try again in a couple hours, or tomorrow.

Pollinator